Armacell’s PET foam innovation on display at JEC -As loose PET-based beads for manufacturing ready-to-use 3D-shaped foam cores for composite sandwich structures, ArmaShape combines the high mechanical properties of structural foam cores with the advantages of particle foams, offering lightweight and strong 3D-shaped foam parts that are producible in nearly any shape – Armacell PET foam innovation JEC

Armacell PET foam innovation JEC Armacell PET foam innovation JEC  Armacell PET foam innovation JArmacell PET foam innovation JEC Armacell PET foam innovation JEC Armacell PET foam innovation JEC EC  Armacell PET foam innovation JEC  Armacell PET foam innovation JEC  Armacell PET foam innovation JEC  

Armacell’s PET foam innovation on display at JEC

Armacell, a leader in flexible foam for the equipment insulation market and a leading provider of engineered foams, will be presenting its latest innovation, ArmaShape, at the upcoming JEC World exhibition, which takes place in Paris next month. According to the company, the PET foam innovation brings significant benefits to many industries where lightweight, yet strong plastic parts are prerequisites for a successful product design.

As loose PET-based beads for manufacturing ready-to-use 3D-shaped foam cores for composite sandwich structures, ArmaShape combines the high mechanical properties of structural foam cores with the advantages of particle foams, offering lightweight and strong 3D-shaped foam parts that are producible in nearly any shape.

Armacell PET foam innovation JEC

“Since Armacell’s breakthrough of PET foams in the composite industry, we have underlined our technical leadership with a series of pioneering inventions – above all, our unique and patented r-PET technology to produce PET foams cores made of 100% recycled PET,” said Thomas Kessel, Managing Director, Armacell PET Foams. “The launch of ArmaShape again confirms our strategy of constantly innovating environmentally friendly PET foam solutions to solve market challenges and create value to our customers.”

Demanding applications

Starting from recycled PET flakes, the polymer is granulated and further processed by Armacell’s patented technology to produce ArmaShape. These PET-based beads are then filled into a mould and fused by a newly developed technology into the finished part. Thanks to a moulding technology that requires no additional production steps like milling or manual forming, ArmaShape will offer considerable overall cost savings for end applications, the company explains.

The high service temperature of up to +180°C opens a door to more demanding applications that are currently blocked by the limited technical performance of traditional particle foams. The fine and smooth surface structure of ArmaShape-moulded foam parts is said to provide an excellent bond to any commercial resin and limit resin uptake without additional treatment.

Eco-friendly

Like all Armacell’s PET foam products, ArmaShape is manufactured and processed in an eco-friendly manner without using CFCs or HCFCs. Furthermore, grades employing the latest generation of halogen-free flame retardants have been developed with tailored fire retardancy characteristics. Made from 100% recycled PET and recyclable again after their use phase, ArmaShape represents a sustainable alternative to comparable materials, according to the manufacturer.

As the inventor of flexible foam for equipment insulation and a leading provider of engineered foams, Armacell develops innovative and safe thermal, acoustic and mechanical solutions. Armacell’s products aim to contribute to global energy efficiency. With 3,000 employees and 25 production plants in 16 countries, the company operates two main businesses, Advanced Insulation and Engineered Foams. Armacell focuses on insulation materials for technical equipment, high-performance foams for high-tech and lightweight applications and next generation aerogel blanket technology.

www.armacell.com

Cooling Fabrics Are Becoming Really Cool – Companies involved in the development of fabrics that achieve a cooling effect are proliferating in the U.S. to meet demands by apparel makers and other manufacturers – Cooling Fabrics Becoming Really Cool

Cooling Fabrics Are Becoming Really Cool

Companies involved in the development of fabrics that achieve a cooling effect are proliferating in the U.S. to meet demands by apparel makers and other manufacturers.

Cooling Fabrics Becoming Really Cool

A fishing shirt made with Brrr fabric

COOLING FABRICS

Some use unique construction to achieve cooling while others employ some kind of chemical additive. These products, most of which have been developed over the past few years, are advancing all along the supply chain, from fiber to chemical manufacturers to fabric developers.

Founded in 2014, Brrr is an Atlanta-based startup cooling-fabric company whose chemical-free technology is embedded into garments at the nanotech level.

Cofounder and Chief Executive Mary-Cathryn Kolb said Brrr’s technology is superior because it doesn’t involve chemicals. She is one of the inventors of the technology, which came about from research done at the University of Georgia, the University of Kentucky and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Most cooling fabrics, she noted, are a lot of hype with the mechanics behind it being moisture wicking. Other ventures dip fabrics into chemicals, which are applied to the surface.

But Brrr’s technology has an all-natural mineral compound that acts as the cooling agent. “In suits or sheets or blankets, we feel we can do better and make them more comfortable and more pleasing in our everyday life,” Kolb said. “It’s part of the DNA of the fibers. They never wash out and never diminish.”

The company is currently producing fabric for men’s suits, women’s dresses, men’s dress shirts, undershirts, socks, underwear and bedding.

Brrr’s fabrics have achieved high ratings in tests conducted by the Hohenstein Institutein Germany, and the company was asked to be a charter member of Advanced Functional Fabrics of America, a nonprofit institute near the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a member of the National Network of Manufacturing Innovation Institutes, which is trying to bring back manufacturing to the United States.

Also in the cooling-fabric business is Po­lartec, the longtime company known for its Deltaproduct. Karen Beattie, the product manager who drove Delta’s development, said it is different because it helps provide real metabolic cooling for the life of the garment. She asserts that other technologies provide temporary or sensorial cooling or they can wash out over the life of a garment.

“It’s based on science, but it’s simple,” Beattie said. “Use fiber choice and fabric construction to amplify what our bodies do naturally to provide cooling. Evaporative cooling is the single biggest way our bodies dump excess heat when we sweat. We’ve constructed a fabric with hydrophilic yarns that hold just the right amount of sweat on your skin to experience prolonged evaporative cooling. The fabric also employs raised knit structures and highly breathable hydrophobic areas so you never get that clammy, sticky-shirt feeling.”

Delta products became commercially available for Spring 2017. Brands that have adopted it include OiselleRhoneOutdoor Research and Fox Racing in the U.S. These are specialists in running, cycling and training garments.

In the fiber category, Israel-based Nilit is among the cool-category pioneers with its Breeze technology. The nylon 6,6 fiber came to the market about four years ago.

Molly Kremidas, marketing manager at Nilit North America, said the goal with Breeze is to achieve comfort through moisture management. She said it is consistent with trends of lighter fabrics.

“We do create our own polymer with an additive inside the polymer that we can’t disclose,” Kremidas explained. “We developed this. We went to a laboratory in Belgium [Centexbel Textile Research Center] for testing. There’s not really a true standard in the industry right now on how to measure cooling.”

Breeze yarns feature a flat cross-section structure with a wide surface that transfers body heat. Kremidas said initial tests showed that Breeze resulted in a temperature change on the surface of 1 degree centigrade.

That was enough to impress two performance-apparel brands. Fast-forwarding a few years, ExOfficio launched a line using Breeze in both tops and bottoms. It’s also used in Adidas’ Climachill products, in Puma shoes and in Playtex intimate apparel. Kremidas notes that it has applications in knits, warp knits and wovens.

Coolcore, a company headquartered in Portsmouth, N.H., has been around a little longer, having been launched in 2011.

It is different in that its cooling effects are achieved by fabric construction rather than chemicals. Coolcore’s first products were cooling towels and ice wraps for medical uses, but it has gradually moved into an array of fabrics used in performance apparel.

The technology dates back to 2008 and was discovered purely by accident, said Kevin McCarthy, the company’s chief executive.

Coolcore’s chief technology officer, while working at Malden Mills on sublimation fabric for printing, discovered that the fabric evaporated moisture and created a cooling effect. This technology eventually became the basis for Coolcore.

Coolcore has working arrangements with a couple of mills to produce fabrics to its specifications. Either Coolcore or the mills buy specific yarns, and the mills either knit or weave the fabrics.

Related Topics

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Henkel boasts strong sustainability record in 2017 – Sustainability performance improved once more – Henkel sustainability record 2017 ocean plastic

Henkel sustainability record 2017 ocean plastic Henkel sustainability record 2017 ocean plastic  Henkel sustainability record 2017 ocean plastic  Henkel sustainability record 2017 ocean plastic  Henkel sustainability record 2017 ocean plastic  Henkel sustainability record 2017 ocean plastic  Henkel sustainability record 2017 ocean plastic  

Henkel boasts strong sustainability record in 2017

  • Sustainability performance improved once more
  • More than 50,000 employees serving as sustainability ambassadors
  • Partnership launched to stop ocean plastic
  • Leading positions in international indices and ratings

Henkel sustainability record 2017 ocean plasticDÜSSELDORF, Germany–(BUSINESS WIRE)–“In 2017, we made clear progress in implementing our sustainability strategy and reaching our sustainability targets. We are proud of the fact that many international rating agencies have recognized our achievements with excellent ratings and have acknowledged Henkel as one of the world’s leading companies in the area of sustainability,” said Kathrin Menges, Executive Vice President Human Resources and Chair of Henkel’s Sustainability Council.

“In 2017, we made clear progress in implementing our sustainability strategy and reaching our sustainability targets. We are proud of the fact that many international rating agencies have recognized our achievements with excellent ratings and have acknowledged Henkel as one of the world’s leading companies in the area of sustainability”

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Creating sustainable value

Henkel wants to create sustainable value – for its customers, employees, shareholders and society. At the same time, it plans to triple its efficiency by 2030.

In the 2017 fiscal year, the company once again made real progress towards achieving its medium-term targets for 2020 (compared to the base year 2010):

  • Energy consumption and CO2 emissions (per ton of product) were reduced by 24 percent.
  • Waste volumes (per ton of product) shrank by 32 percent.
  • Water consumption (per ton of product) was lowered by 24 percent.
  • Occupational safety (per million hours worked) was improved by 17 percent.
  • Net sales (per ton of product) increased by 5 percent.
  • Overall, Henkel was able to improve the relationship between value created and environmental footprint by 43 percent compared to the base year 2010. By 2020, the company plans to increase its resource efficiency by 75 percent.

In light of the Paris Climate Agreement and the commitment made by the international community to limit global warming to significantly less than two degrees Celsius, Henkel is committed to making an active contribution to climate protection. To achieve this, the company is focusing on reducing the carbon footprint of its entire production by 75 percent by 2030. Henkel also strives to source 100 percent of the electricity for its production from renewable sources by 2030. Its interim target for this goal is to achieve 50 percent coverage by 2020. Henkel follows the long-term vision of becoming a climate-positive company.

More than 50,000 employees trained as sustainability ambassadors

“We mainly have our employees’ immense dedication to thank for the progress we made in 2017,” said Kathrin Menges. “Since 2012, we have trained more than 50,000 employees as sustainability ambassadors – which makes this program one of Henkel’s largest further education initiatives to date. We don’t simply want to pass on knowledge about sustainability to our employees. We also want to encourage them to share that knowledge with their colleagues, suppliers, customers and even school children in order to make a social contribution. That is an important step towards giving the topic of sustainability an even greater role to play in the day-to-day activities of every single employee.”

Partnerships for more sustainability

In addition to its employees, Henkel also gets its partners throughout the value chain involved. For example, the company works together with Plastic Bank, a social enterprise aiming to stop ocean plastic and provide opportunities for people in poverty. At collection stations like the one in Haiti, local communities can turn in the plastic waste that they have collected and exchange it for money, donations in kind or social services. This plastic is then processed for reuse as a recycled material to support the circular economy.

Leading position confirmed in indices and ratings

Henkel’s sustainable business practices and efforts have also impressed independent sustainability experts, rating agencies and capital markets: Henkel is listed as industry group leader in the “Household and Personal Products” category in the Dow Jones Sustainability Indices, both World and Europe. Henkel also features in the following sustainability indices:

  • ECPI Indices,
  • Ethibel Sustainability Indices,
  • Euronext Vigeo Eiris Sustainability Indices,
  • FTSE4Good ethical index for the 17th consecutive year,
  • Global Challenges Index,
  • MSCI ESG Leaders and SRI Indices,
  • STOXX Global ESG Leaders Indices.

In the ratings of Oekom Research and Sustainalytics, Henkel was recognized as the leading company in its industry.

About Henkel

Henkel operates globally with a well-balanced and diversified portfolio. The company holds leading positions with its three business units in both industrial and consumer businesses thanks to strong brands, innovations and technologies. Henkel Adhesive Technologies is the global leader in the adhesives market – across all industry segments worldwide. In its Laundry & Home Care and Beauty Care businesses, Henkel holds leading positions in many markets and categories around the world. Founded in 1876, Henkel looks back on more than 140 years of success. In 2017, Henkel reported sales of 20 billion euros and adjusted operating profit of around 3.5 billion euros. Combined sales of the respective top brands of the three business units – Loctite, Schwarzkopf and Persil – amounted to 6.4 billion euros. Henkel employs more than 53,000 people globally – a passionate and highly diverse team, united by a strong company culture, a common purpose to create sustainable value, and shared values. As a recognized leader in sustainability, Henkel holds top positions in many international indices and rankings. Henkel’s preferred shares are listed in the German stock index DAX. For more information, please visit www.henkel.com.

Contacts

Henkel
Rabea Laakmann, +49 211 797-6976
rabea.laakmann@henkel.com
or
Hanna Philipps, +49 211 797-3626
hanna.philipps@henkel.com

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Gneuss brings rotation and automation to NPE – Gneuss Extrusion Technology will showcase a number of innovative new plastics processing technologies for plastics processing and extrusion – Gneuss rotation automation NPE

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EU mulls new measures for ‘single circular economy’, taxes on plastics – The EU should keep and recycle its “valuable plastic” within a “single circular economy”, according to the European Commission’s vice president for jobs, growth, investment and competitiveness – EU single circular economy taxes plastics

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EU mulls new measures for ‘single circular economy’, taxes on plastics

Source:ICIS News

LONDON (ICIS)–The EU should keep and recycle its “valuable plastic” within a “single circular economy”, according to the European Commission’s vice president for jobs, growth, investment and competitiveness.

Jyrki Katainen added that China’s recent plastic waste import ban is “a great opportunity for Europe” and proposed several ideas for future legislation.

These included labelling plastic consumables with durability timelines, ensuring plastics used for packaging are of similar standards and the possibility of fiscal measures such as taxes.

Banning microplastics in cosmetics and defining biodegradable plastic under EU law are also on the Commission’s agenda, he said.

EU single circular economy taxes plastics Katainen was speaking at an annual European Parliament meeting earlier this week.

“Our biodegradable plastic is misleading. People usually understand that you can put it to your home compost or the normal compost, which is not the case,” he said.

“We need awareness raising and to specify under European standards what biodegradable [means] in this context means.”

He said the environmental implications of using biomass to make plastics should also be considered.

A single-use plastic directive, possibly to include straws or single-use cups, is also in the pipeline.

Six new products are being deliberated for inclusion in the EU’s eco-design directive.

“The problem is [that] now we have too many different plastics that, when put together, [and] are not easy to separate or recycle,” said Katainen.

The Commissioner added that only 5% of overall plastic consumption in the EU is of recycled plastics, while only 6% of plastics are recycled in the 28-country bloc.

“95% [of consumed plastic] is virgin plastic made of oil – and this must be changed.”

He added that labelling products with lifetime expectations and recycling information would be a likely influence on consumer behaviour.

Many French manufacturers have voluntarily agreed to state on their labelling how long technological and plastic products will last, starting in 2020.

Taxation, on the other hand, could be applied on several levels.

“In plastics… One of the issues is whom we should tax. The one buying the raw material for plastic, the plastic producer [or] the consumer. Or would it better just to [increase] tax [on] oil which is used for plastics and other purposes?”

UK taxes the use of very thin single-use plastic packaging were hailed for raising awareness among consumers, rather than for providing financing to the circular economy.

Katainen said taxes might be levied at both national and EU levels.

The vice president further announced plans to take the EU’s influence beyond its borders – both at sea and in high-level economic dialogues with Asian nations.

“The bigger source of microplastics comes from marine littering and the most effecting approach is to cooperate on an international level,” he said.

“I want to include the circular economy [in] high level economic [dialogues] with China and Japan.”

The EU is already in talks with China and is due to start high-level economic talks with Japan.

The Commission also plans to pay closer attention to fishing industry waste, a significant cause of ocean pollution.

In the end, only 5% of plastic packaging waste value stays in the EU, according to Katainen.

And not having China to process our plastic junk “puts us in a situation that we really have to innovate,” he concluded.

ALREADY ON THE AGENDA
– By 2030 all plastic packaging should be reusable and recyclable by improving design and increasing recyclable content
– Launching EU-wide pledging campaign to boost update of recyclable plastic to public and industrial authorities
– Curb micro-plastic waste and littering, including damage by bioplastics
– In 2018 the Commission will develop strategy for its innovation research agenda of plastics; in 2020 EU is to invest €100m in research into plastics innovation
– Reduce ocean waste by tackling use of single-use items and fishing gear
– In cooperation with the European Investment Bank (EIB), establish a Circular Economic Finance support platform to help steer investments and innovation
– Improvements in the water sector: increased transparency rules and improved confidence in tap water to encourage drinking tap water, which could help households save more than €600m/year and reduce use of plastic bottles

Picture source: PhotoAlto/REX/Shutterstock

For more news and analysis on the EU’s plastics recycling policies and how they could affect the polymers and petrochemicals markets, visit the ICIS landing page

By Clare Pennington
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Top 4 Nanotechnologies Already Used In Fashion – Top 4 nanotechnologies already used in fashion. According to the Consumer Products Inventory, more than 1,700 products are manufactured with nanocomponents and nanoparticles – Top 4 Nanotechnologies Fashion nanocomponents nanoparticles

Top 4 Nanotechnologies Fashion nanocomponents nanoparticles Top 4 Nanotechnologies Fashion nanocomponents nanoparticles  Top 4 Nanotechnologies Fashion nanocomponents nanoparticles 

Top 4 Nanotechnologies Already Used In Fashion

Top 4 Nanotechnologies Fashion nanocomponents nanoparticles

Top 4 nanotechnologies already used in fashion. According to the Consumer Products Inventory, more than 1,700 products are manufactured with nanocomponents and nanoparticles. These particles measure between 1 and 100 nanometers. That is between 1 and 100 billionths of a metre, across.

“Recent developments in electron microscopy pertaining to its instrumentation (aberration correctors, ultra-fast electron energy loss spectrometers, monochromators) and the innovation with respect to specimen holders (in situ liquid cell, in situ heating) have benefitted the study of catalyst nanoparticles enormously,” said Sagar Prabhudev, a PhD student in Prof. Gianluigi Botton‘s Microscopy of Nanoscale Materials Research Group at McMaster University.

The fashion industry is among the top users of such nanocomponents, as listed in the survey. Nowadays, several apparel manufacturers use nanoparticles as coatings on clothing to make them waterproof, microbicidal, UV-blocking or antistatic. Here are WTVOX top 4 nanotechnologies already used in fashion:

TOP 4 NANOTECHNOLOGIES ALREADY USED IN FASHION – SILVER NANOPARTICLES

Microbe-killing Silver Nanoparticles. A large growing number of clothing manufacturers add silver nanoparticles to kill bacteria and fungi and prevent the unpleasant odours such microorganisms can cause. Nanosilver particles work by releasing positively charged ions that destroy bacterial cells. Due to the minute size of the particles the piece of apparel remains soft and wearable.

TOP 4 NANOTECHNOLOGIES ALREADY USED IN FASHION – NANOSILICA PARTICLES

Nanosilica Particles For Waterproofing And Stain Resistance. Nanoparticles of silica added to a fabric or sprayed onto its surface form a coating that repels water and stain-producing liquids. The silica coating ensures that liquids create beads that roll off the fabric and prevent soaking into it.

TOP 4 NANOTECHNOLOGIES ALREADY USED IN FASHION – DIOXIDES PARTICLES

Sunblocking titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. To prevent consumers from getting sunburnt through the garments many manufacturers incorporate nanoparticles of titanium dioxide or zinc oxide into textiles to protect your clothing and your skin from sun damage. The companies use nanoparticles because they are the most effective in scattering the ultraviolet light in sunlight.

TOP 4 NANOTECHNOLOGIES ALREADY USED IN FASHION – ANTISTATIC PARTICLES

It is a well-known fact that synthetic fabrics like polyester and nylon gather static charge. But nanoparticles that conduct electricity, including zinc oxide, titanium dioxide and antimony-doped tin oxide, are able to disperse this charge.

Top 4 Nanotechnologies Fashion nanocomponents nanoparticles

Catalytic nanoparticles play a crucial role in accelerating chemical reactions by offering their active sites and surfaces. Fine-tuning surface structure during synthesis and phase transformations can enhance their catalytic activity and durability by manifolds.

These days, most clothes containing nanotechnology are made from standard fabrics and materials with an application of nano-coating. But, in the future, innovative materials and fabrics made from nanofibres are to be used. These innovative materials will have nanoparticles and nanofilaments already woven into their fibres.

A new era of ‘smart’ and connected garments fabrics able to respond to your body’s constant changes and connect with the environment surrounding you is just about to come.

Relatrd Topics

Nanotechnology, Smart Textiles & Wearables – Nanotechnology Smart Textiles

Saltex and mtex+ sign cooperation agreement – Eight companies of the Smart Textiles Platform from the Austrian region Vorarlberg will exhibit at the seventh international fair for technical textiles mtex+, which takes place from 29-30 May in Chemnitz, Germany – Saltex mtex agreement Smart Textiles Platform

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Saltex and mtex+ sign cooperation agreement

Eight companies of the Smart Textiles Platform from the Austrian region Vorarlberg will exhibit at the seventh international fair for technical textiles mtex+, which takes place from 29-30 May in Chemnitz, Germany.

“We already took part at the mtex+ several times with a joint booth and we would like to expand the interesting contacts we made,” explained Smart-Textiles coordinator Günter Grabher.

“We are glad that the trade fair organisers from Chemnitz and Dornbirn, Austria, officially agreed upon a cooperation between mtex+ and Saltex.”

Saltex mtex agreement Smart Textiles Platform

Key element of the agreement is the mutual accordance of advantageous conditions for companies from both regions Vorarlberg and East Germany to participate at the shows.

“From our perspective the profiles of both events are fully complementary. They both take place in the centre of innovative textile regions.

Interesting is also the fact that mtex+ and the exhibition for lightweight construction LiMA take place at the same time,” said Dr-Ing Jenz Otto, Managing Director of the association for the North-East German Textile and Clothing Industry, Chemnitz, Germany.

He announced that several member companies of the vti will showcase for the first time their novelties on a joint booth at Saltex.

Successful premiere

At the second edition of Saltex, a trade fair and a symposium on smart textiles and high-performance materials, leading associations like the Confederation of the German Textile and Fashion Industry, as well as the industry association ivgt for technical textiles, again confirmed their participation.

Further industry enterprises like Alge Elastic, Getzner or Güth & Wolf registered as exhibitors. At the upcoming Saltex, representatives of research institutions will get the opportunity to show their innovative exhibits.

Saltex mtex agreement Smart Textiles Platform

After the experience of the successful premiere in 2016 the association Carbon Composites (CCeV) based in Augsburg, Germany decided to participate again at Saltex upcoming September.

CCeV is a group of companies and research facilities that covers the entire value chain of high-performance fibre composites in the DACH region.

“Last but not least a trade fair like Saltex is very interesting for us due to the geographical proximity. We are primarily cross-linked in the DACH region, consider ourselves as an innovation driver and seek the dialogue with interesting partners from hybrid lightweight construction.

Therefore, we feel that the trade segment High Performance Materials is the right place for us,” commented Alexander Gundling, Managing Director, Carbon Composites e.V.

Smart textiles

The second edition of Saltex puts smart textiles into the spotlight. Potential users from construction, mobility, medical or sports and lifestyle as well as smart textile developers shall start a dialogue.

Second core topic is the development, production and application of textile high-performance materials (HPM). Integral link and visitor magnet is the Smart Textiles Symposium, that takes place simultaneously with the exhibition Saltex since 2016.

Visits at companies located in Vorarlberg will round up the events programme.

Saltex mtex agreement Smart Textiles Platform

Saltex, which takes place from 12-13 September, will be held concurrently with the  57th Dornbirn-GFC. The traditional Mayor’s evening will be co-hosted by both organisers Saltex and Dornbirn-GFC as bilateral networking event.

www.saltex.at

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