Avantium begins construction of plant that spells good news for bio-plastics – Avantium plant bioplastics

Avantium begins construction of plant that spells good news for bio-plastics.

Avantium plant bioplastics“Our novel single-step process can finally fulfil this demand in an environmentally sustainable manner that both consumers and leading brands have been seeking.”

The advent of bio-based plastic that can be created on an industrial scale gathered pace last week with the imminent construction of a demonstration plant that will advance the development of a key ingredient.

Derived from renewable sugars, mono-ethylene glycol (MEG) is a bio-based compound that can be used to make everyday products such as PET (polyethylene terephthalate) and PEF (polyethylene furanoate) plastics and polyester textiles – materials that close to 100% of which are produced using fossil fuels. The company behind the sustainable alternative is Avantium, the renewable chemistry company that said the plant would provide environmentally-minded consumers and brands with the eco-plastic they crave.

Based on Avantium’s Mekong technology which converts renewable sugars into bio-based MEG, the plant has come following a previous investment from the company of around £17.5 million (€20 million). It is planned to enter operation in 2019 and, when it does, will look to address the imbalance of fossil-based plastics versus bio-based alternatives ahead of the predicted near-doubling of plastic use over the next 20 years to 50 million tonnes.

“Our novel single-step process can finally fulfil this demand in an environmentally sustainable manner that both consumers and leading brands have been seeking,” said Tom van Aken, chief executive officer of Avantium. “This enables renewable products growth for consumers that increasingly demand products brought to them in a responsible manner.”

In addition to Avantium’s work to bring its Mekong technology to “full-scale commercialisation globally”, the Dutch company is looking to do the same with another organism that is used in a wide variety of bio-based processes including adhesives and biofuels, lignin. The technology behind the production of the naturally-occurring organic polymer is called Zambezi and Avantium is nearing completion of a biorefinery pilot plant that will produces glucose and lignin from feedstocks that aren’t from the food chain.

Bio-Based World News reported last year between a joint venture called Synvina, formed between Avantium and another major player in the bio-based industry, the German chemicals company BASF. At the core of the partnership is a focus on producing and marketing FDCA (furandicarboxylic acid) as well as the marketing of the relatively new polymer PEF.

Related Topics

-Global Polyethylene Furanoate (PEF) Market Top Players 2018 – Avantium, ALPLA, Coca-Cola – Global Polyethylene Furanoate PEF Market

-FDCA (2,5-furandicarboxylic acid) biorefineries – FDCA has two carboxylic acid groups, which makes it a suitable monomer for polycondensation reactions with diols or diamines – FDCA furandicarboxylic acid PEF Polyamides

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Latest US, Chinese tariff proposals cover wide swath of petchems, oil products – USA Chinese tariff proposals petchems oil products

Latest US, Chinese tariff proposals cover wide swath of petchems, oil products

 Source:ICIS News

HOUSTON (ICIS)–The latest tariff proposals by the US and China cover a wide swath of petrochemicals and oil products, with the US list alone covering more than 150 different chemicals and derivatives.

USA Chinese tariff proposals petchems oil products

Photo above shows a cargo ship on the Houston Ship Channel. Photo by Al Greenwood

China’s proposed tariffs are not as numerous, but it also includes kerosene, diesel and other oil products as well as crude, propane and natural gas.

The American Chemistry Council (ACC) estimates that $5.4bn in US exports of chemicals and plastics would be exposed to China’s proposed tariffs. If demand does not decline and tariffs are at 25%, then the Chinese government would collect $1.3bn in duties.

The chemical and refined-products tariffs that were proposed by China and the US made up a second set of duties, and they did not specify a date on which they would go into effect.

The first set from both countries would go into effect on 6 July.

A list of the proposed chemical and oil-product tariffs from China and the US is at the bottom. It includes the codes for each product’s harmonised tariff schedule (HTS).

During the year, both the American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM) and the American Chemistry Council (ACC) have spoken out against the proposed tariffs.

At the AFPM’s International Petrochemical Conference (IPC) in March the group’s president deemed a US-China trade war as the No 1 threat to the industry.

The ACC also singled out a trade war during its more recent Annual Meeting, which was held in June.

Following the latest tariff proposals, the ACC said the US chemical industry has now been thrust on to the front lines of a trade war with China.

Market players and executives have been more measured in their response to the proposed tariffs.

For polyethylene terephthalate (PET), the effect should be limited. US imports from China fell sharply since antidumping duties imposed in 2016. Also, China is not among the top sources of imported PET.

For propane, China relies on it as feedstock to produce on-purpose propylene at its propane dehydrogenation (PDH) units.

Market sources said tariffs could disrupt trade flows, but US propane exports will eventually find a destination.

“It could put a damper on propane and butane; however, there are many other markets besides China that have an increasing appetite for both,” said a US-based natural-gas liquids (NGLs) broker.

Chinese tariffs on US acrylonitrile (ACN) exports may cause price inflation in China. However, while trade flows in the region may move around, net flows to global regions will likely remain stable.

According to one producer in the US, trade flows will probably “adjust to fit the new laws but the net flows to the regions will be the same”.

Executives expressed similar sentiments during the most recent earnings conference calls held earlier this year.

Rising demand for products such as polyethylene (PE) will have to be met, regardless of tariffs.

In this scenario, Chinese customers would replace US imports with PE shipments from other countries. The US will then export its PE to customers that saw their resin shipments diverted to China.

With that, trade flows would change, but demand would remain the same.

US polyvinyl chloride (PVC) market players were surprised by the announcements earlier this year that China’s list of potential retaliatory tariffs included polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and feedstock ethylene dichloride (EDC or 1,2-dichloroethane.)

China is the US’s second-largest PVC export market after Canada and the largest buyer of US EDC.

China already has import fees on US PVC, but these are not applied if the resin imported from the US is then made into products that are re-exported. Most US PVC exports to China are treated this way and market participants expect that that arrangement will continue. If that happens, then the proposed tariffs should have little impact on US PVC trade flows.

The fate of US EDC trade with China is harder to discern. It is not clear if the same rules will apply.

Declining shipments in recent months may be an indicator that market participants see that business as threatened by the tariffs.

About 40% of the EDC imported into China in February originated in the US. US EDC exports to China account for about 28% of the nation’s EDC shipments in 2017, according to data from the International Trade Commission (ITC).

US EDC producers have in the past year found new buyers in Brazil and in Europe. In Brazil, Braskem has de-bottlenecked its PVC plant and is buying EDC to increase vinyls production.

In Europe, chlor-alkali plant closures have left a couple of PVC plants in the Mediterranean market without ready access to chlorine. Inexpensive EDC from the US appears to be working for the feedstock.

That has put current estimates of the tariff outcome as likely rearranging trade routes, but not necessarily upsetting the markets.

US proposed tariffs

HTS codesProduct
27071000Crude benzene
27072000Crude toluene
27073000Crude xylene
27101930Lubricating oils, w/or w/o additives, fr petro oils and bitumin minerals (o/than crude) or preps 70%+ by wt fr petro oils
27101935Lubricating greases from petro oil/bitum min/70%+ by wt fr petro oils but n/o 10% by wt of fatty acid salts animal/vegetable origin
27101940Lubricating greases from petro oil/bitum min/70%+ by wt fr petro oils > 10% by wt of fatty acid salts animal/vegetable origin
34031910Lubricating preparations containing 50% but less than 70% by weight of petroleum oils or of oils obtained from bituminous minerals
34031950Lubricating preparations containing less than 50% by weight of petroleum oils or of oils from bituminous minerals
34039900Lubricating preparations (incl lubricant-based preparations), nesoi
38112100Additives for lubricating oils containing petroleum oils or oils obtained from bituminous minerals
38112900Additives for lubricating oils, nesoi
39011010Polyethylene having a specific gravity of less than 094 and having a relative viscosity of 144 or more, in primary forms
39011050Polyethylene having a specific gravity of less than 094, in primary forms, nesoi
39012010Polyethylene having a specific gravity of094 or more and having a relative viscosity of 144 or more, in primary forms
39012050Polyethylene having a specific gravity of 094 or more, in primary forms, nesoi
39013020Ethylene copolymer: Vinyl acetate-vinyl chloride-ethylene terpoly w/ < 50% deriv of vinyl acetate, exc polymer aromatic/mod arom monomers
39013060Ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymers, nesoi
39019010Polymers of ethylene, nesoi, in primary forms, elastomeric
39019055Ethylene copolymers, in primary forms, other than elastomeric
39019090Polymers of ethylene, nesoi, in primary forms, other than elastomeric
39021000Polypropylene, in primary forms
39022010Polyisobutylene, elastomeric, in primary forms
39022050Polyisobutylene, other than elastomeric, in primary forms
39023000Propylene copolymers, in primary forms
39029000Polymers of propylene or of other olefins, nesoi, in primary forms
39031100Polystyrene, expandable, in primary forms
39031900Polystyrene, other than expandable, in primary forms
39032000Styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) copolymers, in primary forms
39033000Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) copolymers, in primary forms
39039010Methyl methacrylate-butadiene-styrene (MBS) copolymers, in primary forms
39039050Polymers of styrene, nesoi, in primary forms
39041000Polyvinyl chloride, not mixed with any other substances, in primary forms
39042100Polyvinyl chloride, mixed with other substances, nonplasticized, in primary forms
39042200Polyvinyl chloride, mixed with other substances, plasticized, in primary forms
39043020Vinyl chloride copolymer: Vinyl acetate-vinyl chloride-ethylene terpoly w/< 50% deriv vinyl acetate, exc polymer aromatic/mod arom monomers
39043060Vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate copolymers, nesoi
39044000Vinyl chloride copolymers nesoi, in primary forms
39045000Vinylidene chloride polymers, in primary forms
39046100Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), in primary forms
39046910Fluoropolymers,elastomeric, other than polytetrafluoroethylene, in primary forms
39046950Fluoropolymers, other than elastomeric and other than polytetrafluoroethylene, in primary forms
39049010Polymers of vinyl chloride or of other halogenated olefins, nesoi, in primary forms, elastomeric, in primary forms
39049050Polymers of vinyl chloride or of other halogenated olefins, nesoi, in primary forms, other than elastomeric, in primary forms
39051200Polyvinyl acetate, in aqueous dispersion
39051900Polyvinyl acetate, other than in aqueous dispersion, in primary forms
39052100Vinyl acetate copolymers, in aqueous dispersion
39052900Vinyl acetate copolymers, other than in aqueous dispersion, in primary forms
39053000Polyvinyl alcohols, whether or not containing unhydrolyzed acetate groups, in primary forms
39059110Copolymers of vinyl esters or other vinyls, in primary forms, containing by weight 50% or more of derivatives of vinyl acetate
39059150Copolymers of vinyl esters or other vinyls, in primary forms, nesoi
39059980Polymers of vinyl esters or other vinyl polymers, in primary forms, nesoi
39061000Polymethyl methacrylate, in primary forms
39069010Acrylic polymers (except PMMA) in primary forms, elastomeric
39069020Acrylic plastics polymers (except PMMA), in primary forms, nonelastomeric
39069050Acrylic polymers (except plastics or elastomers), in primary forms, nesoi
39071000Polyacetals in primary forms
39072000Polyethers, other than polyacetals, in primary forms
39073000Epoxide resins in primary forms
39074000Polycarbonates in primary forms
39075000Alkyd resins in primary forms
39076100Polyethylene terephthalate, having a viscosity number of 78 ml/g or higher
39076900Polyethylene terephthalate, having a viscosity number less than 78 ml/g
39077000Poly(lactic acid)
39079120Unsaturated allyl resins, uncompounded
39079140Unsaturated allyl resins, nesoi
39079150Unsaturated polyesters, other than allyl resins in primary forms
39079920Thermoplastic liquid crystal aromatic polyester copolymers
39079950Other polyesters nesoi, saturated, in primary forms
39081000Polyamide-6, -11, -12, -6,6, -6,9, -6,10 or -6,12 in primary form
39089020Bis(4-amino-3-methylcyclohexyl)methaneisophthalic acid-laurolactam copolymer
39089070Other polyamides in primary forms
39091000Urea resins; thiourea resins
39092000Melamine resins
39094000Phenolic resins
39095010Polyurethanes, elastomeric, in primary forms
39095020Polyurethanes: cements, in primary forms
39095050Polyurethanes, other than elastomeric or cements, in primary forms
39100000Silicones in primary forms
39111000Petroleum resins, coumarone, indene, or coumarone-indene resins and polyterpenes, in primary forms
39119010Elastomeric polysulfides, polysulfones and other products specified in note 3 to chapter 39, nesoi, in primary forms
39119015Specified carbodiimide or homopolymer with polyethylene thermoplastic goods
39119025Thermoplastic polysulfides, polysulfones & oth products spec in note 3, chapt 39, cont aromatic monomer units or derived therefrom
39119035Benzenamine; and hydrocarbon novolac cyanate ester
39119045Thermosetting polysulfides, polysulfones & oth products spec in note 3, chapt 39, cont aromatic monomer units or derived therefrom
39119070Chlorinated synthetic rubber
39119090Polysulfides, polysulfones & other products specified in note 3 to chapter 39, nesoi
39121200Cellulose acetates, nesoi, in primary forms, plasticized
39122000Cellulose nitrates (including collodions), in primary forms
39123900Cellulose ethers, other than carboxymethylcellulose and its salts, in primary forms
39129000Cellulose and its chemical derivatives nesoi, in primary forms
39131000Alginic acid, and its salts and esters, in primary forms
39139010Chemical derivatives of natural rubber, nesoi, in primary forms
39139050Natural polymers and modified natural polymers, nesoi, in primary forms
39140020Cross-linked polyvinylbenzyltrimethylammonium chloride (Cholestyramine resin USP)
39140060Ion-exchangers based on polymers of headings 3901 to 3913, in primary forms, nesoi
39161000Monofilament with cross-section dimension over 1 mm, rods, sticks, profile shapes, at most surface-worked, of polymers of ethylene
39162000Monofilament with cross-section dimension over 1 mm, rods, sticks, profile shapes, at most surface-worked, of polymers of vinyl chloride
39169010Monofilament with cross-section dimension over 1 mm, rods, sticks, profile shapes, at most surface-worked, of acrylic polymers
39169030Monafilament nesoi, of plastics, excluding ethylene, vinyl chloride and acrylic polymers
39169050Rods, sticks and profile shapes, at most surface-worked, of plastics, nesoi
39172100Tubes, pipes and hoses, rigid, of polymers of ethylene
39172200Tubes, pipes and hoses, rigid, of polymers of propylene
39172300Tubes, pipes and hoses, rigid, of polymers of vinyl chloride
39172900Tubes, pipes and hoses, rigid, of other plastics nesoi
39173100Flexible plastic tubes, pipes and hoses, having a minimum burst pressure of 276 MPa
39173200Tubes, pipes and hoses, of plastics, other than rigid, not reinforced or otherwise combined with other materials, without fittings
39174000Fittings of plastics, for plastic tubes, pipes and hoses, nesoi
39191010Self-adhesive plates, sheets, other flat shapes, of plastics, in rolls n/o 20 cm wide, light-reflecting surface produced by glass grains
39191020Self-adhesive plates, sheets, other flat shapes, of plastics, in rolls n/o 20 cm wide, not having a light-reflecting glass grain surface
39199010Self-adhesive plates, sheets, other flat shapes, of plastics, light-reflecting surface produced by glass grains, nesoi
39199050Self-adhesive plates, sheets, other flat shapes, of plastics, not having a light-reflecting surface produced by glass grains, nesoi
39201000Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not reinforced or combined with other materials, of polymers of ethylene
39202000Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not reinforced or combined with other materials, of polymers of propylene
39203000Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not reinforced or combined with other materials, of polymers of styrene
39204310Nonadhesive plates/sheets/film/foil/strip made imitation of patent leather, of vinyl chloride polymers, not less 6% plasticizers
39204350Nonadhesive plate/sheet/film/foil/strip, noncellular, not comb w/other materials, of vinyl chloride polymers, not less 6% plasticizer, nesoi
39204900Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil, strip, noncellular, not combined w/other materials, of polymers of vinyl chloride, < 6% plasticizers
39205110Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of polymethyl methacrylate, flexible
39205150Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of polymethyl methacrylate, not flexible
39205910Nonadhesive plates,sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of acrylic polymers, flexible, nesoi
39205940Transparent sheeting containing 30% or more by weight of lead
39205980Plates, sheets, film, etc, noncellular, not reinforced, laminated, combined, of other acrylic polymers, nesoi
39206100Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of polycarbonates
39206200Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of polyethylene terephthalate
39206310Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of unsaturated polyesters, flexible
39206320Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of unsaturated polyesters, not flexible
39206900Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of polyesters, nesoi
39207100Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of regenerated cellulose
39207300Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of cellulose acetate
39207905Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of vulcanized fiber
39207910Nonadhesive films, strips, sheets, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of other cellulose derivatives nesoi, n/o 0076 mm thick
39207950Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of cellulose derivatives, nesoi
39209100Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of polyvinyl butyral
39209200Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of polyamides
39209300Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of amino-resins
39209400Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of phenolic resins
39209910Nonadhesive film, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of plastics nesoi, flexible, over 0152mm thick, not in rolls
39209920Nonadhesive film, strips and sheets, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of plastics nesoi, flexible
39209950Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, noncellular, not combined with other materials, of plastics, nesoi
39211100Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, cellular, of polymers of styrene
39211211Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil, strip, cellular, of polymers of vinyl chloride, with man-made textile fibers, over 70% plastics
39211215Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil, strip, cellular, of polymers of vinyl chloride, with man-made textile fibers, n/o 70% plastics
39211219Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, cellular, of polymers of vinyl chloride, combined with textile materials, nesoi
39211250Nonadhesiveplates, sheets, film, foil and strip, cellular, of polymers of vinyl chloride, not combined with textile materials
39211311Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, cellular, of polyurethanes, with man-made textile fibers, over 70% plastics
39211315Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, cellular, of polyurethanes, with man-made textile fibers, not over 70 percent plastics
39211319Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, cellular, of polyurethanes, combined with textile materials nesoi
39211350Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, cellular,of polyurethanes, not combined with textile materials, nesoi
39211400Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, cellular, of regenerated cellulose
39211900Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, cellular, of plastics nesoi
39219011Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil, strip, of noncellular plastics combined with man-made fibers, n/o 1492 kg/sq m, over 70% plastics
39219015Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil, strip, of noncellular plastics combined with man-made fibers, n/o 1492 kg/sq m, n/o 70% plastics
39219019Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, of noncellular plastics combined with textile materials, nesoi, not over 1492 kg/sq m
39219021Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, of noncellular plastics combined with cotton, over 1492 kg/sq m
39219025Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, of noncellular plastics combined with man-made fibers, over 1492 kg/sq m
39219029Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, of noncellular plastics combined with textile materials, nesoi, over 1492 kg/sq m
39219040Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, flexible, nesoi, of noncellular plastics
39219050Nonadhesive plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, nonflexible, nesoi, of noncellular plastics

Chinese proposed tariffs

HTS codeProduct
27040010Coke and semi-coke
27040090Carbon
27050000Gas, water gas, furnace gas and similar gases
27074000Naphthalene
27075000250°C distilled aromatics ≥65% of other aromatic mixtures
27079990Other aromatic products such as distilled coal tar
27081000Tar asphalt
27082000Tar asphalt coke
27090000Petroleum oils and oils obtained from bituminous minerals, crude
27101210Vehicle gasoline and aviation gasoline
27101220Naphtha
27101230Rubber solvent oil, paint solvent oil, extraction solvent oil
27101291Nonene
27101299Other light oil fraction products
27101911Aviation kerosene
27101912Lamp kerosene
27101919Other kerosene fraction products
27101922Fuel oil No 5, No 7
27101923Diesel
27101929Other fuel oil
27101991lubricating oil
27101992Grease
27101993Lubricant base oil
27101994Liquid paraffin and heavy liquid paraffin
27101999Other heavy oil and heavy oil products
27102000Product oil containing biodiesel and products based on it
27109100Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), PCT (PCTs), Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), waste oil
27109900Other waste oil
27111200Liquid propane
27111310Liquefied butane infused cigarette lighter
27111390Other liquefied butane
27111910Other liquefied fuels infused with cigarette lighters
27111990Other LPG and hydrocarbon gases
27112100Gaseous natural gas
27112900Gaseous petroleum gas and other hydrocarbon gases
27121000Vaseline
27122000Paraffin, oil content by weight <0.75%
27129010Microcrystalline wax
27129090Other mineral waxes and similar products
27131110Sulfur content is less than3% of uncalcined petroleum coke
27131190Other uncalcined petroleum coke
27131210Sulfur content is less than 0.8% of calcined petroleum coke
27131290Other calcined petroleum coke
27132000asphalt
27139000Other oil residues
27141000Asphalt shale, oil shale and tar sand
27149010Natural asphalt (Asphalt)
27149020Emulsified asphalt
27149090Asphalt rock
27150000Asphalt mixture based on natural asphalt, etc.
34031900Mineral oil 70% of lubricant
34039900Oil-free or oil extracted from bituminous minerals
39011000Polyethylene having a specific gravity of less than 0.94, in primary forms
39014090Other ethylene alpha olefin copolymers with a specific gravity of less than 0.94
39019090Other polymers of ethylene, in primary forms
39041090Polymers of vinyl chloride or of other halogenated olefins, in primary forms
39069090Other primary shape acrylic polymers
39072090Other primary-shaped polyethers
39073000Primary shape epoxy
39074000Primary shape polycarbonate
39079999Polyacetals, other polyethers and epoxide resins, in primary forms; polycarbonates, alkyd resins, polyallyl esters and other polyesters, in primary forms  (3)
39081011Polyamide-6,6
39089010Aromatic polyamides and their copolymers
39089020Semi-aromatic polyamides and their copolymers
39089090Other polyamides in primary form
39100000silicones in primary form
39119000Petroleum resins, coumaroneindene resins, polyterpenes, polysulphides, polysulphones and other products specified in Note 2 to this Chapter, not elsewhere specified or included, in primary forms  (6)
39121100Primary-shaped, unplasticized cellulose acetate
39199090Other self-adhesive plastic plates, sheets, films and other materials
39201090Other vinyl polymer boards, sheets, films, foils, etc.
39206200Plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, of poly(ethylene terephthalate), noncellular and not reinforced, laminated, supported or similarly combined with other materials
39209990Other plates, sheets, film, foil and strip, of plastics, noncellular and not reinforced, laminated, supported or similarly combined with other materials  (3)
39219090Other Plastic Plates, Sheets, Films, Foil and Strips
39269090Other plastic products
40023990Halogenated butyl rubber sheet, sheet, tape

Additional reporting by David Haydon, Bill Bowen, Lucas Hall, Amanda Hay and Steven McGinn

By Al Greenwood
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‘Requirement of polyester filament yarn is increasing’ – Requirement polyester filament yarn

‘Requirement of polyester filament yarn is increasing’
Requirement polyester filament yarn

The requirement of polyester filament yarn (PFY) is increasing as it is the chief substitute for cotton. Cotton’s low availability, durability and cost are its limitations, while polyester is its cheapest replacement with ample availability, relatively good durability and its applicability for ever increasing purposes, said the head of Supertex Industries.

“It is estimated that the per capita consumption of polyester is likely to increase many folds in the developing world,” said Mahesh Sharma, director, Supertex Industries Limited while speaking to Fibre2Fashion. The company manufactures and exports draw warped and sized yarn beams of polyester and nylon.

There are two segments to the PFY industry. One is partially oriented yarn (POY) which requires further processing in a desired way, and the other is fully drawn yarn (FDY). The FDY is an improvement on the earlier two processes of drawing of yarn. In FDY, the produced yarn can be directly consumed or consumed after processes like twisting, sizing, etc, explained Sharma.

Talking about the latest innovations taking place in the industry, he said, “FDY producing technology was not up to the mark compared to the drawn yarn of similar specification on post spinning machines. This is constantly improving and the two are interchangeable in a majority of the uses. Similarly, dyeing by infusion of masterbatch has become far more superior than earlier. There are other developments like high tenacity yarns, fire retardant yarns and also anti-microbial yarns.”

The challenges faced by the industry include volatile oil prices cause instability in the industry, added Sharma. “Having stayed in the unorganised sector for ages, the weaving industry is limping very slowly into the new era of GST. This slow migration has a pronounced impact on the entire business. Money supply is under constant strain and with the banking industry in its current shape, the industry is facing many issues that will take another quarter to be sorted out.”

Sharma also said that Supertex is inclined towards growth. “We do not want to lose our identity of a boutique company, but want to broadbase our activities by integrating more processes that can buttress our profitability.”

Click here to read the complete interview.

Fibre2Fashion News Desk – India

Related Topics

-Govt May impose Anti-Dumping Duty on Chinese Polyester Yarns – India AntiDumping Duty Chinese Polyester Yarns

-U.S. imposes anti-dumping tariffs on Taiwan textile firms – The U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) has decided to impose anti-dumping tariffs on fine denier polyester staple fiber suppliers in Taiwan – USA antidumping tariffs Taiwan textile firms

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Weekly resin report: Polypropylene prices may have peaked – Polypropylene prices peaked

Weekly resin report: Polypropylene prices may have peaked

Resin Pricing
Source : PlasticsToday

Activity in the spot resin markets pulled back a bit last week, as higher prices and recently receding monomer costs pushed resin buyers to the sidelines to observe, reports the PlasticsExchange (Chicago) in its Market Update.

Railcar offers of both polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) began to flow stronger toward the end of the week, resulting in decent accumulation. Resellers, also viewing the end of the quarter, started to seek outlets for their aged inventory. While the PP market is still essentially oversold with limited excess capacity, imports have been heavy and have had an impact on supply. This week’s sharp decline in forward PGP levels will likely deflate importers’ enthusiasm for new purchases. PE buyers are looking for producers to ease high- and low-density contracts in June, matching the $0.03/lb decrease that many received for linear low-density contracts in May.

Spot PE trading started the week slowly, but turned up the heat as the week wore on; all in all, the PlasticsExchange describes transacted volumes as only average. Deal making became more difficult as asking prices for some PE grades inched higher. Buyers that needed material paid up, while others who did not feel pressure to procure were happy to sit on the sidelines, not sensing any real threat of a long-term bullish price trend. The PlasticsExchange reports that its PE prices were generally flat, with a slight uptick in high density for injection and a downtick in blowmolding. Low-density PE for film remains snugly supplied. Producers have continued to absorb the vast majority of new PE production and add it to inventory for future (export) sale, rather than bleed it into the domestic market, which would negatively impact prices.

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Collective upstream PE inventories have mushroomed to a record 4.8 billion lb, a full 50% more than the 3.2 billion lb at the end of October, which was the aftermath of the hurricane. PE exports have been growing and actually surpassed 1 billion lb in May, but export growth needs to accelerate quicker in order to move all the added production. In the meantime, PE reactors were throttled back to the low 90% range in May, but still generated another (small) build. North American PE processors have yet to truly reap the rewards in the form of lower prices. After several failed attempts, some question the validity of the $0.03/lb contract increase that is still floating out there and are calling for an official rescind of the nomination.

After a very strong start to the month, which saw soaring monomer prices fuel short-term resin demand, PP trading slowed substantially this past week. PP prices had been climbing along with monomer and began to crimp demand among those who could afford to wait out the increases. There was the potential for another sharp PP contract increase for June, some of which has been relieved from the recently deflating PGP levels. Prices along the PP supply chain have been very volatile, notes the PlasticsExchange, and this rally feels a lot like it did in the beginning of 2018, when runaway PGP prices created cost-push PP price increases, which soon busted.

This past week, resellers continued to offer material at elevated prices, looking to get extra value from their inventories, but many processors took a moment to let the new higher price level sink in. By the end of the week, importers with uncommitted resin on the water became nervous and eased asking prices; the top could be in. PP prices never quite realized their potential during this current rally, so while monomer costs are subsiding, resin levels only eased a cent this past week. It will be very interesting to see how the markets play out in the last two weeks of June, writes the PlasticsExchange.

Read the full Market Update on the PlasticsExchange website.

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-Saudi major’s PP, PE offers emerge in Mid-East and Africa – Saudi PP PE MidEast Africa

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Saudi Dilemma: Output Boost Could Hurt Its Oil-Based Economy – Saudi Dilemma Output Oil Based Economy

Saudi Dilemma: Output Boost Could Hurt Its Oil-Based Economy

  •  Kingdom needs $87.90 a barrel oil to balance budget: IMF
  •  Most top OPEC members are in surplus or close to it at $70 oil

Saudi Arabia’s plan to halt the oil-price rally could hurt its economy, depriving the kingdom of billions of dollars in income that it needs more than many other OPEC members.

Although the country’s economy isn’t the most reliant on crude exports among the group’s five biggest producers — Kuwait gets that distinction — Saudi Arabia is the only member that will post a significant budget deficit despite higher-than-expected oil prices this year, according to Bloomberg calculations based on International Monetary Fund data.

A decline of just one dollar in average prices this year to $69 a barrel would wipe out any financial benefit for the kingdom if it boosts exports by about 500,000 barrels a day, according to the calculations.

Saudi Arabia has to juggle competing interests in this week’s meeting of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries: maximizing oil revenue (without crimping demand), and placating its close ally U.S. President Donald Trump who blamed the group for sending oil prices “artificially Very High!” The kingdom’s plan to phase out 18 months of production cuts faces opposition within OPEC, starting with Iran, Iraq and Venezuela.

The Saudis are targeting an increase even though higher crude prices could boost the valuation of Saudi Aramco, the world’s biggest oil company, if the government carries out a planned initial public offering next year.

“Saudi Arabia benefits from higher oil prices but is pushing a plan that can drive them lower,” said Ziad Daoud, chief Middle East economist for Bloomberg Economics. “This paradox can’t be explained by economic interests alone.”

Crude Crutch

The contribution of oil exports to GDP for the top 5 OPEC producers

 Saudi Dilemma Output Oil Based Economy

While Saudi Arabia wants to increase production to thwart shale oil’s expansion and spur demand for crude, it also wants to avoid Trump’s wrath, putting Riyadh in a bind to find a price suitable for everyone.

Read: Saudis More Confident OPEC Will Agree to Oil-Supply Increase

Here are some other economic indicators that could influence decisions at OPEC’s June 22 meeting in Vienna:

Deficit Spending

Saudi Arabia’s projected budget deficit in 2018 is among the widest in OPEC

Saudi Dilemma Output Oil Based Economy

Saudi Arabia has the biggest deficit among the group’s five largest producers, and any extra cash from oil could help pay for its economic transformation plan. It can also stem the bleeding of foreign reserves, which have swung from about $10 billion of declines a month in 2016 when oil was trading at about $45 a barrel, to an accumulation of $13 billion in March, the biggest inflow since late 2013. The nation pumped 10.01 million barrels a day last month and still has the most spare production capacity of any OPEC member.

Swing to Surplus

Oil’s rebound, if sustained this year, will help major exporters avoid deficits

Saudi Dilemma Output Oil Based Economy

Four of OPEC’s top five producers can meet their government spending goals with oil prices at about $70 a barrel. The exception is Saudi Arabia, which needs a price of $87.90 a barrel to balance its budget this year, according to the IMF, which forecasts crude to average $62.30 a barrel in 2018. Benchmark Brent fell 0.9 percent to $74.65 a barrel at 8:22 a.m. in London, after climbing 2.6 percent on Monday.

Regional Laggard

Saudi Arabia’s economic growth rate is trailing its peers

Saudi Dilemma Output Oil Based Economy

Economic growth rates for OPEC producers don’t fully reflect this year’s gains in oil prices, but Persian Gulf exporters are showing some wiggle room in their budgets. Governments have revamped previously shelved investment plans and introduced new stimulus packages. Abu Dhabi said in June that it will spend an additional $13.6 billion over three years to spur growth. Kuwait is developing a cluster of islands as a tourism and trade hub, and even Saudi Arabia gave government employees a $13.3 billion bonus in January.

— With assistance by Javier Blas

(Updates with oil price in 10th paragraph.)
Source : Bloomberg

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-Oil pulls back from gains; OPEC says glut nearly gone – Oil prices on Thursday hit highs not seen since 2014, built on the ongoing drawdowns in global supply and as Saudi Arabia looks to push prices higher, though U.S. crude gave back gains in the afternoon to finish lower – Crude Oil OPEC glut Saudi Arabia

-Escalating Middle East Tension Could Trigger Oil Prices To Hit $100 Per Barrel – Oil prices could soon soar to $100 per barrel amid growing fear about conflict in the Middle East, according to an oil analyst for CNBC – Oil Prices $100 Barrel

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Could the petrochemicals boom lead to a shortage in plastics additives? – Petrochemicals plastics additives

Could the petrochemicals boom lead to a shortage in plastics additives?

by: Norbert Sparrow

Total global manufacturing capacity for polyolefins is expected to increase by 45 million tons by 2022, according to the 2018 World Petrochemical Conference, and much of that growth will be driven by the United States. For Baerlocher USA (Cincinnati, OH), a supplier of plastics additives, that translates into an estimated 20% higher demand for its products. Combine that with restrictions placed on some traditional additive chemistries in Europe, and you have the outlines of a great business opportunity, one that Baerlocher USA saw coming early on.

 Petrochemicals plastics additives
Baeropol DRS 6812 SP is a drop-in replacement for phosphite stabilizers used with polyolefins and other thermoplastics.

“In 2015, we identified areas where we thought North American supply might not be able to keep up with demand, so we started investing,” Ed Hall, President and CEO of Baerlocher North America, told PlasticsToday. “Last year, for example, we invested in a reactor to increase capacity for metal soaps at our Cincinnati facility.” Calcium, zinc, sodium and other metal soaps are used as acid scavengers, stabilizers, internal and external lubricants, water repellants and mold release agents.

When I spoke with Hall at NPE2018 in Orlando, FL, he also mentioned that he was waiting on approval for another “large investment” to keep up with projected growth in polyolefins. As of this writing, however, I have not seen anything pop up in my newsfeed.

Like many manufacturers, your shop floor operations may be challenged with inefficient processes, unpredictable downtime, and difficulties with machinery maintenance. A manufacturing execution system (MES) can help make the most of your shop floor’s capabilities, with tools that can identify under-performing and high-performance machines, and then optimize asset utilization accordingly.

At NPE2018, Baerlocher introduced Baeropol DRS 6812 SP, a drop-in replacement for phosphite stabilizers used with polyolefins and other thermoplastics. The additive, which is part of the Baeropol resin stabilization technology platform, features improved hydrolytic stability and polymer solubility compared with traditional phosphates.

Luxury vinyl tile market steps up

Opportunity also came knocking for Baerlocher in the form of luxury vinyl tile (LVT), a market that is poised for significant growth, according to Hall. “[LVT manufacturers] Tarkett is investing $60 million in its factories in Alabama, and Shaw has spent something like $300 million to convert a carpeting plant to an LVT facility,” said Hall.

Baerlocher recently developed a stabilization chemistry for the wear layer of rigid LVT designed to address the flooring industry’s safety and sustainability goals. The new Baeropol technology uses calcium- and zinc-based stabilizers that are individually formulated for each layer of LVT. They deliver thermal stability, reduced yellowing and increased clarity compared with conventional technologies.

The company’s formulation experts also work closely with LVT manufacturers to develop custom solutions. Baerlocher helped the first U.S. manufacturer of rigid LVT by creating a stabilization technology for the new rigid core product. It met the customer’s requirements for sustainability (no barium) and odor elimination (no tin). The startup successfully entered the U.S. LVT market with a first-of-its-kind product manufactured in North America, said Baerlocher.

Also on the PVC front, the “United States is one of the few places globally that substantially uses tin stabilizers for rigid profiles like windows,” said Hall. “Europe has gotten out of tin to comply with REACH regulations, and, while that does not apply to North America, customers are starting to say that they want to get out of tin, too. It’s becoming a bit of a dirty word. We don’t necessarily agree that it should be a dirty word, but we sell calcium and zinc stabilizers, so that’s a good trend for us,” said Hall.

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-Fewer chemicals registered than expected in EU as Reach passes final milestone – The final deadline for the EU’s Reach chemicals registration has passed with the total number of dossier submissions for different materials coming in below original forecasts, according to the director of registration at the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) – Chemicals registered EU Reach

-Russia Eyes Petrochemicals As Answer To Crude Oil Reliance – On a sprawling construction site in Western Siberia, about 20,000 workers are busy building what will be one of the world’s five biggest petrochemical plants – On a sprawling construction site in Western Siberia, about 20,000 workers are busy building what will be one of the world’s five biggest petrochemical plants, part of a play by Russia to capture more of the value from the oil it produces – Russia Petrochemicals Crude Oil Reliance

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100% biodegradable packaging company expands – 100% biodegradable packaging Sulapac

100% biodegradable packaging company expands – 100% biodegradable packaging Sulapac

 Anna Demming
Alternatives to plastic packaging by Sulapac. Courtesy: Sulapac

100% biodegradable packaging SulapacWhile a lot of biomedical researchers aim to save lives Suvi Haimi, CEO and co-founder of Sulapac, wanted to save the planet. “We were devastated by the plastic pollution of the oceans,” says Haimi. Working in biomedical materials research at the time, she realised she could use her expertise in this field to develop an alternative to plastic.

Sulapac produces materials made from wood composites using natural binders derived from starch and glucose. Their products are 100% biodegradable and contain 0% microplastics.

Founded in 2016 the company’s first focus was the cosmetic industry. “I looked in my bathroom cabinet and saw it was full of plastic,” says Haimi. Unsurprisingly, there was more to the decision of which industry to focus their initial attention on than a cursory glance while getting ready for bed. “We spent a lot of time looking into customer segments,” Haimi tells Physics World Materials. “A new material costs money so we needed pioneering customers.” They then spent a lot of time defining the properties with their customer, bringing not just a material to market but a full design. Haimi believes this may be a crucial factor in the company’s success compared with others who have attempted to introduce environmentally friendly plastic alternatives.

Embarking on a portfolio for the food sector will require new designs but Haimi believes this should be easier the second time around. Certainly there is plenty of demand for alternatives to plastic for food packaging to protect and prolong food lifetimes and reduce food waste.

In May 2018 Sulapac started collaborating with Fazer, a leading producer of food and food services in the Baltic region, who plan to use Sulapac materials for packaging their Christmas products in December 2018. “Fazer is actively involved in discussions on recycling and re-use of packaging waste, as well as the development of new kinds of environmentally friendly packaging solutions,” says Nina Elomaa, Corporate Responsibility Director of the Fazer Group.

Sustainability at every stage

Haimi and co-founder Laura Kyllӧnen have long been aware of the plastic pollution issue on account of their field of work. However whereas formerly a lot of public education work was needed to raise awareness, nowadays plastic pollution is big news with the general public too. Yet in some ways available alternatives lag behind demand.

“A lot of alternatives to plastics are only 97% biodegradable and still contain 3% microplastics,” Haimi tells Physics World Materials. “We think 0% microplastics is important.”

She also highlights her concerns about the slow biodegradation rate of some bioplastics, such as polylactic acid, which can still take 10 years to degrade in the ocean. Sulapac use barrier materials inside their jars to keep the contents sealed from the environment, and this barrier layer is the slowest to biodegrade. Yet testing their materials in industrial compost, Sulapac products degrade in less than 30 days in compost, which is even a little faster than wood.

Haimi and her team are keen to establish the sustainability of every stage in the life cycle of their products from production to re-use and recycling, and studies to clarify this are ongoing. Already the company is keen to source the wood sustainably using local resources, and while the world’s forests may not cope with demand if everyone switched entirely from plastic to Sulapac material Haimi says they can use a range of primary materials including grass.

They also use unprocessed wood, which not only saves energy but improves the scalability of production. Another bonus in their production compared with other ecological packaging material producers is that they can use the same moulds as plastics, saving on resources and reducing obstacles for companies to work with Sulapac composites instead of plastic.

Next Steps

Now in its second year, the company began as the brain child of Haimi with Kyllӧnen, who was her first graduate student. They soon brought on board Taneli Vӓisӓnen and Antti Pӓrssinen, who not only had expertise in wood composites but had founded their own company and could bring their business experience to the table as well.

In the interests of staying focused enough to remain successful, Sulapac will not be working on alternatives to plastic bags. “There are good alternatives for this already,” says Haimi. However they are looking into flexible versions of the material for other single-use applications to further increase the impact of their products in reducing plastic pollution.

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-Plastics Releases Bioplastics Report, Calls for Research and Innovation – New U.S. Consumer Survey Shows Increased Understanding and Support for Bioplastics in the Marketplace – Plastics Releases Bioplastics Report

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Advent of Bioplastic Packaging open New, Lucrative Paradigm in Eco-friendly Packaging – Bioplastic Packaging Paradigm Ecofriendly Packaging

Advent of Bioplastic Packaging open New, Lucrative Paradigm in Eco-friendly Packaging

The concept of recyclability and biodegradation of packaging materials has opened up several exciting paradigms in the global packaging industry. The vast interest in bioplastics across the globe has stemmed from this. Bioplastics are either bio-based or biodegradable or both and their popularity stems from the characteristic that they are primarily biodegradable. Retailers from various industries world over who have recently jumped into the bandwagon of sustainability consider bioplastic packaging as a lucrative proposition. Manufacturers and end users tending to dissociate the negative effects of plastic packaging are switching to novel bioplastics not made from fossil-based feedstock.

Factors Influencing Demand Dynamics

  • Low-Carbon Footprint and Higher Stability of Bioplastics over Conventional Plastics Attractive Propositions

The spiraling adverse repercussion of using conventional plastics on the overall ecology, notably in contributing to the mounting problem of plastic pollution across the globe, has led various countries to shift to bio-based options. Retail industry in particular are increasingly adopting bioplastic packaging for food packaging applications. They pitch the attractiveness on the vast ecological benefits bioplastics brings in, of which low-carbon footprint and greater suitability and stability over other packaging materials are the key ones. The market has also been exploring several new options in bio-plastic intermediates to meet the requirements of end users.

  • Rising Awareness of Mounting Problem of Plastic Pollution key Impetus

Various curbs on the use of conventional plastics, notably non-degradable plastic bags, in several developing and developed nations have provided a robust impetus to the demand for bioplastics for packaging applications in various end-use industries. Governments in several countries grappling with the adverse ecological effects of plastic pollution from the indiscriminate disposal of conventional plastics are promoting the use. This is fueling the global uptake of bioplastic packaging among retailers. The industry efforts to reduce the reliance on petrochemicals in the making of plastics is another crucial trend making the demand for bioplastics a compelling proposition.

  • Eco-friendliness of Bioplastics key Proposition

The attractive, rising adoption of sustainable packaging in various end-use industries, including agriculture, pharmaceutical, and agriculture, is a key factor underpinning the demand for bioplastics. Some of the key bioplastics materials are Bio-PET and polylactic acid (PLA). The rising awareness of environmental-friendliness in various parts of the globe is also stoking the demand for bioplastic packaging. In the food packaging applications, packaging materials frequently end up in food waste, where non-compositibility can been a key concern. However, bioplastics may be an enticing answer to this problem.

  • R&D Activities and Innovations to Lead the Way

The high production cost of bioplastics materials and its limited biodegradability are key concerns that still hold the bioplastic market back in the way to realize its full potential. Nevertheless, these concerns are expected to be addressed with continued innovations in the market. Furthermore, government initiatives to enhance the cost-performance of bioplastic also augurs well for the retail industry capitalizing on the bioplastic packaging.

Constant research are being done to see the feasibility of bioplastics for packaging applications. Researchers at the University of Otago, New Zealand, announced in June 2018 that they are developing a flexible food wrap made of bioplastics. The plastics packaging is made from polymers from corn and shellfish and is claimed to be readily compostable. This packaging will be used primarily in ready to eat meals. Such efforts go a long way to alleviate the problem of plastic pollution.

  • Europe witnessing Lucrative Demand

The high pricing of bioplastics-packaged products may hinder its wider adoption among price-sensitive consumers, notably in countries of Asia Pacific. However, developed regions such as Europe and North America are lucrative markets for bioplastic packaging. In particular, Europe is adding attractive revenue share to the global market. A factor attributing the growth is substantial efforts by governments to incentivize bioplastic packaging. Furthermore, the stricter implementation of environmental protection initiatives in its several economies discouraging the use of conventional plastics has also bolstered the demand for bioplastic packaging.

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-Plastics Releases Bioplastics Report, Calls for Research and Innovation – New U.S. Consumer Survey Shows Increased Understanding and Support for Bioplastics in the Marketplace – Plastics Releases Bioplastics Report

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Will Opec meet end the long rally in global oil prices? – Opec meet end global oil prices

Will Opec meet end the long rally in global oil prices?

Reports that Opec members and Russia shall review their production cuts are making the crude oil markets jittery

Pallavi Pengonda

Opec meet end global oil prices

Increased production of US shale oil took some sheen away from the anticipated impact of the output cuts. Graphic: Mint

The big event to watch this week, apart from the football World Cup, is the Opec (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) meeting in Vienna on Friday.

Reports that Opec members and Russia shall review their production cuts are making the crude oil markets jittery. Brent crude prices dropped to $73.44 a barrel last Friday, the lowest since 2 May.

Also affecting crude oil prices are the retaliatory tariffs China has imposed on US crude oil, part of the escalating trade war between them. Suresh Sivanandam, senior manager Asia refining at consultancy Wood Mackenzie, said US crude oil exports to China have been in the range of 300,000 barrels per day in the March 2018 quarter, accounting for more than 20% of total crude oil exports.

To be sure, China’s tariffs on US crude oil do not mean that global oil demand will be affected, said Ritesh Jain, chief investment officer at BNP Paribas Asset Management India Pvt. Ltd. “But to that extent, the development coming ahead of the Opec meeting adds to the nervousness in the oil markets,” he said.

According to Jain, for the oil markets, the Opec meeting is crucial, as its planned 1.8 million barrels per day (mb/d) output cut went a long way in boosting crude oil prices. It isn’t yet a done deal, as Iran is opposed to increasing production and Brent futures recovered after reports of a much smaller compromise output hike.

In practice, the production cuts have far exceeded that, with cuts totalling nearly 2.5 mb/d in April 2018, pointed out BP Statistical Review of World Energy last week. The excess is mostly driven by the collapse in crude oil production in Venezuela.

Increased production of US shale oil took some sheen away from the anticipated impact of the output cuts. Nevertheless, “the speed and scale of Opec’s actions mean that it continues to have the ability to smooth temporary disturbances to the oil market”, pointed out BP’s review.

Lower crude oil prices are of course helpful for India. It helps keep inflation under check and reduces the import bill. A fall in oil prices would soothe concerns about the burgeoning current account deficit and take the pressure off the rupee.

In the equity markets, shares of state-run oil marketing companies (OMCs) went up 2.7-5% on Monday, a day when the benchmark Sensex declined a bit. OMCs include Hindustan Petroleum Corp. Ltd, Bharat Petroleum Corp. Ltd and Indian Oil Corp. Ltd.

Nitin Tiwari, an analyst at Antique Stock Broking Ltd, said a correction in global crude oil/product prices has given OMCs an opportunity to restore and normalize retail marketing margins. A softer refining margin environment has also helped this time around, as it keeps product prices lower.

“As a result, despite frequent downward reduction in domestic retail prices, the marketing margins have gradually improved to about Rs1 per litre (for petrol) and about Rs1.65 per litre (for diesel) after hitting a low of about Rs0.3 a litre (petrol) and about Rs0.7 per litre (diesel),” added Tiwari.

Aviation stocks too cheered the fall in crude oil prices.

Related Topics

-ASIA: The week ahead in petrochemicals -Crude oil price movements and the upcoming meeting in Vienna on June 22 among OPEC members and other oil exporters are factors that will influence the performance of Asian petrochemical markets this week – ASIA petrochemicals

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KraussMaffei Reviews Highlights of Competence Forum – KraussMaffei Highlights Competence Forum

KraussMaffei Reviews Highlights of Competence Forum

 KraussMaffei Highlights Competence Forum

More than 1,800 visitors attended the KraussMaffei Competence Forum in Munich, Germany, on 6-7 June to celebrate the company’s 180th anniversary under the theme ‘Technology Pioneers – from Tradition to Innovation.’

“The KraussMaffei Competence Forum was a great success,” states Dr Frank Stieler, CEO of the KraussMaffei Group. “The broad spectrum of ground breaking machines and technologies that we were able to show our customers at our in-house trade show made it a unique event indeed. It was very well received by the visitors.”

An injection moulding machine for each decade

Visitors were offered a total of 25 machine presentations. In injection moulding machinery alone, there were 18 exhibits (about one machine per decade) that presented live applications within the clamping force range 25-1600 tons. Among these were the new PX 25 and PX 320, with which KraussMaffei is expanding its all-electric series by adding two clamping force sizes, one lower and one higher. The PX 25 demonstrated micro-injection moulding of liquid silicone (LSR). A radial sealing ring was produced with an intricate undercut and a weight of only 0.15 g. The bigger machine, with a clamping force of 3,200 kN, was displayed together with the IMD SI DUO film feed. This is said to enable the world’s first independent positioning of two single-image designs, which increases output using multi-cavity moulds, but also enhances production flexibility.

Additional highlights were the GX 650 with the new speed option, thermoplastic lightweight construction with FiberForm technology, ColorForm applications in piano black, and new technologies for fibre glass direct feed or for direct compounding.

Reaction Process Machinery’s anniversary

KraussMaffei’s Reaction Process Machinery division was also celebrating an anniversary of its own: 50 years ago a special clamping unit with two rotation axes for processing polyurethane was introduced to the market for the first time. Visitors were able to see the highlights of the last 50 years on a timeline. The exhibit was accompanied by numerous live applications. The biggest visitor attractions included the new iPul pultrusion system, which produced a hollow chamber profile based on glass fibre and a polyurethane matrix, and the PUR foaming system with new multi-colour mixing head. Visitors also witnessed fibre-reinforced lightweight construction ready for large-scale production on the fully automated wetmoulding system.

Extrusion technologies

Live systems from the pipe and profile manufacturing sector were on display. Visitors were shown the TCP (Thermoplastic Composite Pipe) pilot line which demonstrated the precise wrapping of a base pipe with fibreglass tapes for high-pressure applications in the oil and gas industry. In addition, the newly developed three-layer pipe head produced a three-layer pipe with a functional inner layer made from PA 12.

Experiencing Plastics 4.0

At numerous exhibits, the KraussMaffei Group presented its entire Plastics 4.0 product line to illustrate the possibilities of Industry 4.0 in plastics processing. Highlights included the new MES system, MaXecution, and the live application of the DataXplorer on the GX 650 FiberForm system. With its microscopic view, it records up to 500 signals on the machine, including the organic sheet heat-up time. All injection moulding machines were equipped with the intelligent APC plus (Adaptive Process Control) machine function, which provides extreme weight consistency of parts and the highest process reliability.

KraussMaffei is launching its Digital Service Solutions business unit on 1 July. This will deal with service and aftermarket and link classic and digital activities.


Photo provided by KraussMaffei

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-KraussMaffei’s global investments to reach $81 million in 2018 – KraussMaffei Group is investing $81 million in major projects this year, including IT infrastructure and software and expansions at its facilities around the world – KraussMaffei investments $81 million 2018

-To celebrate 180 years trading KraussMaffei will host a machinery showcase in Munich – The KraussMaffei Group is opening its doors in Munich on June 6 and 7, 2018, giving visitors a glimpse of the latest technologies and innovations from the KraussMaffei, KraussMaffei Berstorff and Netstal brands that make the company a leader in mechanical engineering – KraussMaffei machinery showcase Munich

-KraussMaffei at NPE: Efficient injection molding machines and intelligent Industry 4.0 solutions are setting trends for the future – KraussMaffei NPE Efficient injection molding Industry 40 solutions

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