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Water stabilized hydrogen technology

Water-stabilized hydrogen fuel promises twice the range of gasoline at half the price, with zero tailpipe emissions  Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

Automotive
Water stabilized hydrogen technology
Electriq-Global, an Israeli-Australian company, claims it’s invented a new fuel that combines the best aspects of gasoline, hydrogen and batteries into a cheap, green and recyclable liquid(Credit: tomwang/Depositphotos)

Israeli-Australian company Electriq Global’s new technology stabilizes hydrogen in a recyclable liquid that can be pumped and transported just like gasoline.

That’s huge news, because it enables long-range electric driving with fast refueling – and it plugs right into the existing fuel logistics model.Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

Plenty of people want to move on from gasoline and diesel. Some are environmentalists, some want to stop supporting the geopolitics of oil, some like the lightning-quick performance potential of electric motors.Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

Whatever the reason, the fuel that powered the 20th century seems unlikely to maintain its transport lead through the 21st.

But today’s alternatives to fossil fuels all have their difficulties. EV batteries, for example, are heavy and expensive, they can struggle with heat, and they take an uncomfortably long time to charge, which many consumers aren’t willing to deal with on longer trips.

Mind you, batteries are significantly better than straight-up hydrogen, which is energy-inefficient to produce, difficult to store and transport, and adds explosive potential to crashes.Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

Hydrogen’s main selling point is its ability to fit into current fuel distribution infrastructure; you can pump it into a car like gasoline, so if gas stations started carrying it, you’d be able to fill up anywhere.Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

But Electriq Global, an Israeli-Australian company, claims it’s invented a new fuel that combines the best aspects of gasoline, hydrogen and batteries into a cheap, green and recyclable liquid that it believes could be the transport fuel of the future.

Electriq says it has worked out a way to stabilize hydrogen in a liquid form that’s around 60 percent water.

This makes it simple to transport and store, eliminating the single biggest reason why hydrogen hasn’t taken off at this point.

Using a standard sized fuel tank, the Electriq system would, according to modeling, cost less than half the equivalent gasoline price to fill up, and it would deliver around twice the range, while being completely emissions-free – at least, back to the fuel production plant.

Here’s how it works. Electriq produces the fuel at a production/recycling center. According to Electriq spokesman Michael Simonetti, the recipe is “surprisingly simple,” and doesn’t require any rare or expensive elements.

When it’s fully loaded, the fuel contains about three percent hydrogen and 97 percent supporting material.Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

The fuel is moved via tanker to gas stations, much the same as happens with gasoline, and drivers fill up their cars at a pump.

Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

The fuel tank in the car, which is about the same size as a regular fuel tank, has a separate module called the “Switch,” which releases small amounts of a catalyzing chemical into the fuel tank to release the hydrogen from the fuel.

Once the hydrogen is released, it’s sent directly to a fuel cell to be converted into electric energy, which is then used to power an electric drivetrain. Everything from the fuel cell onwards is standard and already on the road in existing fuel cell vehicles.

“If you picked up a Toyota Mirai today,” says Simonetti, “and took out the hydrogen tank, and switched it out with this fuel tank and the Switch, which is a single set of componentry, you’ve got a working car.”

Once enough of the Switch catalyst has been used to release all, or most, of the hydrogen, it’s time to refill the tank – but one unique feature of the Electriq technology is that the remaining fuel material (comprising some 97 percent of the total volume) is completely recyclable.

Thus, when you go to the gas station to fuel up, it’s a dual process, in which your spent fuel is pumped out, and fresh fuel is pumped in.

This two-way fuel process goes all the way back up the chain; the gas station would store a tankful of spent fuel, which an Electriq tanker would pick up after dropping off fresh fuel, and take it back to the production facility where it will have the hydrogen put back in.

Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

So what you end up with is a zero-emissions electric vehicle with a huge range, whose liquid hydrogen “battery” can be quickly and conveniently filled up at a gas station for half the price of regular unleaded.

This neglects, of course, one of the strongest features of battery-electric vehicles: if you slow-charge them at home overnight, or while parked at the office, you can do the vast majority of your driving without ever needing to hit a fast-charge station.

But you could easily design a hybrid Electriq/electric car that runs on a small, cheap, wall-chargable battery to cover daily use, and that uses the Electriq system to provide a massive range boost and instant recharging on longer trips.

Naturally, we had questions. So we put them to Simonetti, as well as Electriq Global CEO Guy Michrowski.

What’s the well-to-wheels energy efficiency of the process?

“The overall thermodynamic efficiency of the process is over two thirds,” says Michrowski. “Most of it is during the fuel recycling process. No energy is lost on-board the vehicle. Energy loss in the fuel cell (typically <50 percent) and EV are the same as with EVs using compressed hydrogen.”

This information really doesn’t affect the consumer, who will be much more interested in the ability to quickly and cheaply refuel their electric car and drive long distances.

But in the context of an overall transport ecosystem, you can look at it in terms of energy usage and overall system emissions.

If you have a given amount of energy, let’s say 100 kWh, and you put it into a typical lithium-ion EV battery, you can expect somewhere between 80-90 kWh to make it to the electric motors, because that’s about the charge-discharge efficiency rate of lithium-ion.

If you take that same 100 kWh and convert it into Electriq fuel, you’ll have maybe 70 kWh by the time it gets into your car’s fuel tank, and you’ll lose somewhere around half of that as the fuel cell converts the hydrogen back into electric energy. So you could end up with 35-40 kWh reaching the motors.

So it’s about half as efficient as a battery, and any upstream emissions at the power generation plant will effectively be double what you’d get running a battery, even though both an Electriq car and a battery-powered electric car will have zero tailpipe emissions.

Does the Switch catalyst need to be refilled?

“Yes,” says Simonetti, “like a filter on a car. Once a year, or whatever it ends up being.”

For the distribution model to work you will need petroleum companies to get on board. Why would they dedicate pump space to a competing product?

“It’s not a competitive product,” says Simonetti. “Yes, the petrol companies own the petrol stations. But if you can offer a bigger margin to them, then it’s profitable.

And if there’s more room to play with the margins … from the numbers we’ve gone over with the team, the buffers are better.

Wholesale to retail pricing margins can be much better, and people are still driving green cars and getting a better price for their fuel.

“Even if that price goes up a bit because, say, Shell won’t do it without a bigger margin, well OK, that’s part of the negotiations.

Maybe it comes at a 1:1 price to start with, who knows? That stuff’s all on the table. All we know is the modeling tells us we can produce it a lot cheaper than petrol.”

Where are things at with getting manufacturers on board?

“There’s a truck builder in China that’s been exposed to the end to end process and components, because they’re building vehicles utilizing the technology,” says Simonetti. “There’s a range of applications like that where joint venture partners do have access to the technology.

“[Electriq is making] an incredible claim. It’s something now that we all want vetted in a commercial rollout.

But the data stacks up. The joint venture partners, they’re the ones that are doing the vetting right now.

“Our roadmap talks about a generator, it talks about an unmanned drone, a truck, and there’s also a commercial grade production plant in Israel that’s being built to create and recycle the fuel on a commercial scale.

“We’ve pretty much spoken to everybody [in the mainstream automotive world] and what do you expect? You’re a startup with unbelievable claims, it’s not like you’re adding windscreen wipers or a sunroof.

And even those things were enormous challenges to get embedded into vehicles. With this, you’re changing out the entire ecosystem for the car, and you’re the future. So that’s a long process and conversation.

There’s interest, but there’s no deal signed. There’s no ‘we’ve got Toyota on the dotted line, this is going to happen.’

“It’s very early days in terms of outreach but there’s a lot of people now knocking on our door thanks to the global launch. We’re getting good traction. But it’s how quickly can we make that happen.Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

“One of my goals is to create a community of people that want this technology in their hands. So we can go to manufacturers and say ‘not only do we have a technology, we’ve also got the people that want this. Here’s 10,000, or 100,000 people that would buy your car tomorrow if it was available.'”Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

Anyone who wants to join such a community can do so at the Electriq Global community web page.

What’s the shelf-life of the fuel itself?

“The fuel shelf life is five years,” says Michrowski, “with energy loss of less than 10 percent for the entire period.”

That’s even better than the one-year shelf life of regular unleaded gasoline.

We’ve asked Electriq Global some further questions, and are waiting for responses, but the system certainly seems promising, potentially even revolutionary.

It fits in logistically with the current fuel system, and seems to be able to offer a great deal both to consumers and to retail partners.

It offers zero-emissions, long-range, high-performance electric motoring that lets you “recharge” your electric car in the same amount of time it’d take you to fill up a tank of gas, and it’ll happily work in a hybrid scenario alongside a battery if you want to be able to charge from the wall and enjoy the best of both worlds.

Perhaps the biggest question is, if this system would take five, or 10 years to break through into mainstream use, with large-scale Electriq fuel production and recycling plants in major cities, and full participation from fuel retailers and vehicle manufacturers alike, what technologies will it be competing against in the mid-to-late 2020s?

Will those five to 10 years see the kinds of quantum leaps we keep hearing about in the battery world, delivering us smaller, lighter, hugely energy-dense batteries that charge super quickly, last tens of thousands of charge cycles and remain thermally stable in crashes? If so, will a solution like the Electriq model maintain its appeal?

Either way, this is an exciting and fascinating technology that we’ll be looking to keep a close eye on as it develops.

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Corbion Total PLA bioplastics Thailand

Corbion and Total launch ‘second-largest PLA bio-plastics plant in the world’ in Thailand  Corbion Total PLA bioplastics Thailand

Corbion Total PLA bioplastics Thailand

Bio-plastics are a great complement to our more traditional petrochemicals products to meet the rising demand for polymers while contributing towards reducing end-of-life concerns.” Corbion Total PLA bioplastics Thailand

The bio-based sector is set to experience a boost after oil giant Total and Dutch biochemicals specialist Corbion recently announced that they have started operations at their new bio-plastics plant in Rayong, Thailand. The facility, run by the joint venture named Total Corbion PLA, will be able to produce 75,000 tonnes of polylactic acid (PLA) per year.

The products will meet customers’ needs in a wide range of markets, including packaging, consumer goods, 3D printing fibres, and the automotive industries, Total Corbion PLA said in a statement.

According to the joint venture, PLA is experiencing strong global demand. PLA products can be mechanically or chemically recycled, or in some cases composted and returned to the soil as fertiliser.Corbion Total PLA bioplastics Thailand

Total Corbion PLA will leverage on the integration with its lactide plant, the monomer required for the production of PLA, that has simultaneously been expanded to 100,000 tonnes per year production capacity.

In addition to this, the company’s 1,000 tonnes per year PLA pilot plant, which has been operational since the end of 2017, is located on the same site and will be used for product development.

“The start-up of this state-of-the-art plant establishes Total Corbion PLA as a world-scale PLA bio-plastic producer, ideally located to serve growing markets from Asia Pacific to Europe and the Americas,” said Stephane Dion, CEO of the joint venture.

She added: “The subsequent increase in global PLA capacity will enable manufacturers and brand owners to move into the circular economy and produce bio-based products with lower carbon footprints and multiple end of life options.”

“I’m very pleased that the joint venture has started-up the second-largest PLA bio-plastics plant in the world.

This achievement is fully in line with our strategy, to expand in petrochemicals and, at the same time, innovate in low-carbon solutions.

Bio-plastics are a great complement to our more traditional petrochemicals products to meet the rising demand for polymers while contributing towards reducing end-of-life concerns,” added Bernard Pinatel, President Refining & Chemicals at Total.

“This is good news for consumers and producers who want to make a conscious choice to improve their carbon footprint and make their contribution to a circular economy.

A world of innovation and business opportunities has opened up while contributing to a better world,” explained Tjerk de Ruiter, CEO at Corbion.

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Plastic petrochemicals circular economy 15-12-2018

-Water-stabilized hydrogen fuel promises twice the range of gasoline at half the price, with zero tailpipe emissions  Water stabilized hydrogen technology 

Israeli-Australian company Electriq Global’s new technology stabilizes hydrogen in a recyclable liquid that can be pumped and transported just like gasoline.

That’s huge news, because it enables long-range electric driving with fast refueling – and it plugs right into the existing fuel logistics model.Water stabilized hydrogen technology

Plenty of people want to move on from gasoline and diesel. Some are environmentalists, some want to stop supporting the geopolitics of oil, some like the lightning-quick performance potential of electric motors.Water stabilized hydrogen technology

Whatever the reason, the fuel that powered the 20th century seems unlikely to maintain its transport lead through the 21st.

Plastic petrochemicals circular economy

-Corbion and Total launch ‘second-largest PLA bio-plastics plant in the world’ in Thailand

Corbion and The bio-based sector is set to experience a boost after oil giant Total and Dutch biochemicals specialist Corbion recently announced that they have started operations at their new bio-plastics plant in Rayong, Thailand.

The facility, run by the joint venture named Total Corbion PLA, will be able to produce 75,000 tonnes of polylactic acid (PLA) per year.

The products will meet customers’ needs in a wide range of markets, including packaging, consumer goods, 3D printing fibres, and the automotive industries, Total Corbion PLA said in a statement.

Total launch ‘second-largest PLA bio-plastics plant in the world’ in Thailand

Plastic petrochemicals circular economy

-Oil ends higher as Saudis reportedly plan to cut crude to U.S.

West Texas Intermediate and Brent crude oil futures moved sharply higher in Thursday’s trading session, with WTI up 2.8%, after a news report said Saudi Arabia plans to cut shipments to U.S. refiners to avoid expanding U.S. inventories.

Oil prices had already been climbing as traders examined data showing a rise in monthly Opec output, as well as a recent report of a weekly decline in U.S. crude supplies and production.Electriq believes it can produce and distribute the fuel so cheaply that it should sell for half the price of unleaded.(Credit: Electriq)

Plastic petrochemicals circular economy

-Europe PP sellers manage to keep margin in December

Polypropylene (PP) producers in Europe are managing to keep hold of some spread at freely negotiated accounts.

– PP prices down

– 2019 supply to be tight

The December propylene contract fell by €100/tonne, and PP prices are falling by €50-80/tonne, buyers and sellers said.

The PP market is balanced, with no shortages in spite of several production problems.

INEOS’ Grangemouth plant in the UK is under force majeure restrictions, and this week sources said Braskem had declared force majeure from its Wesseling plant in Germany due to lack of propylene from a cracker at the same site.

Some other production was restricted because of propylene issues, caused by low water levels on the River Rhine.

Plastic petrochemicals circular economy

-ELG Carbon Fibre teams up with Boeing to take composite recycling to new heights

Boeing and ELG Carbon Fibre have joined forces to recycle aerospace-grade composite material into products such as electronic accessories and automotive equipment.

The agreement between leading aircraft manufacturer Boeing and ELG Carbon Fibre is ‘the first of its kind for the aerospace industry’. The partnership covers the carbon fibre surplus from 11 Boeing production sites and is estimated to reduce solid waste by more than one million pounds a year.

Electriq believes it can produce and distribute the fuel so cheaply that it should sell for half the price of unleaded.(Credit: Electriq)

Electriq believes it can produce and distribute the fuel so cheaply that it should sell for half the price of unleaded.(Credit: Electriq)

Electriq believes it can produce and distribute the fuel so cheaply that it should sell for half the price of unleaded.(Credit: Electriq)

Plastic petrochemicals circular economy

-Mitsubishi Corp. Acquires Strategic Stake Hold In ELG Carbon Fibre

Mitsubishi Corp. (MC) has entered into an agreement to acquire 25 percent of shares in ELG Carbon Fibre Ltd. (ECF) from ELG Carbon Fibre International GmbH (ECFI), a subsidiary of ELG Haniel GmbH (ELG) in Germany.

The shareholders of ECF will become ECFI and MC. The agreement is subject to regulatory approval and other closing conditions.

ECF’s is engaged in reprocessing surplus carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials from manufacturing operations and end of life parts to produce and supply competitive, high-quality carbon fiber products to the market.

Through its own technology and expertise, ECF is the first company in the world to have established stable commercial production of reprocessed carbon fiber supplying to markets such as the automotive and electronics industries.

Electriq believes it can produce and distribute the fuel so cheaply that it should sell for half the price of unleaded.(Credit: Electriq)

Plastic petrochemicals circular economy

-Vietnamese enterprises advised to expand exports to Poland

Smooth transportation will help boost trading of goods between Vietnam and Poland – Illustrative image (Source: congthuong.vn)

Intensifying information connectivity, increasing product quality, developing a system of sales agents and distributors in Poland are necessary factors for Vietnamese enterprises who want to bring their products to the Polish market.

With a population of over 38 million and average per capita income of 24,000 USD a year, Poland is considered the largest market in Eastern Europe, and one of Vietnam’s leading trade partners.

Plastic petrochemicals circular economy

-AIMPLAS explores the roles of enzymes in sustainability

The Plastics Technology Centre (AIMPLAS) in Valencia, Spain is investigating the roles that enzymes can play in the plastics sector to improve the sustainability of its processes.

The ENZPLAST Project is addressing their role in the washing process of recycled materials, including the complex separation of multilayers, and how different enzymes act in the compost biodegradation process of polymers of different nature. AIMPLAS has involved enzymes in the synthesis of polymers, thus avoiding the use of metal catalysts to result in a safer process for people and the environment.

Supported by the Valencian institute of business competitiveness (IVACE) and cofounded by EU ERDF funds within the 2014-2020 ERDF Operational Programme for the Valencian Region, the ENZPLAST project seeks to address the challenge of implementing synthetic routes to obtain plastics safer for the health of people and eco-friendlier.

Plastic petrochemicals circular economy

-Talking bioplastics in the year of the plastics strategy

“Biomass is the key ingredient that a plastics circular economy must rely on,” stated Stephen Wetmore of WWF South Africa at this year’s European Bioplastics conference.

The vast majority of delegates came to Berlin already committed to the proposition that bioplastics are the logical conclusion to the plastic waste problem that has dominated the agenda in 2018, and as such it was perhaps appropriate that the conference agenda was preoccupied with issues around end of life. Tim Sykes reports.

The 2018 European Bioplastics conference was very much framed around how to deliver circularity in plastics based on renewables, and we benefited from extended discussion of biodegradation, composting, and recycling.

It’s fair to say that no one yet knows how a mature ecosystem of biodegradable and recyclable, non-biodegradable bioplastics will look, let alone the wider landscape of renewable and fossil-based plastics.

Plastic petrochemicals circular economy

-Coca-Cola Announces New Investments in Enhanced Recycling as Part of ‘World Without Waste’ Vision

Coca-Cola is taking steps to be at the forefront of the enhanced recycling movement, which can potentially turn packages such as coloured PET bottles that may have been excluded from certain recycling streams into brand-new PET bottles.

The Coca-Cola system recently announced two investments to speed the development and deployment of breakthrough enhanced recycling technologies that will convert recycled plastic into food-grade PET for use in the company’s beverage bottles.

Unlike mechanical recycling, enhanced recycling allows recovery and reuse of PET plastic without material degradation.

Plastic petrochemicals circular economy

-US oil surge makes Bank of Russia sceptical on Opec+ success

Russian central bank governor Elvira Nabiullina attends a news conference in Moscow on Friday. “The Opec+ deal allows to limit these risks, but doesn’t remove them,” Nabiullina said. “Events of this year clearly show how fast producers can increase shale-oil production when prices remain high.”

Russia’s central bank is not convinced that Opec and its allies’ supply cuts can revive the oil market as it’s being countered by surging US production.

The Bank of Russia cut its crude price outlook for next year to $55 a barrel from $63 on higher supply risks, mainly related to “fast output increase” in America, according to Governor Elvira Nabiullina.

Just a week ago the country’s Energy Minister Alexander Novak brokered a deal that led to the so-called Opec+ group agreeing to cut production by 1.2mn bpd in an effort to boost prices.

Plastic petrochemicals circular economy

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