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Biodegradable Polymers – LyondellBasell to Build Industrial-scale Advanced Recycling Plant in Germany 22-11-2023

Biodegradable Polymers

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LyondellBasell to Build Industrial-scale Advanced Recycling Plant in Germany

LyondellBasell (LYB) today announced it has made the final investment decision to build the company’s first industrial-scale catalytic advanced recycling demonstration plant at its Wesseling, Germany, site. Using LyondellBasell’s proprietary MoReTec technology, this plant will be the first commercial scale, single-train advanced recycling plant to convert post-consumer plastic waste into feedstock for production of new plastic materials that can be ran at net zero GHG emissions. The new plant is expected to have an annual capacity of 50,000 tonnes per year and is designed to recycle the amount of plastic packaging waste generated by over 1.2 million German citizens per year. Construction is planned to be completed by the end of 2025.  Biodegradable Polymers

“We are committed to addressing the global challenge of plastic waste and advancing a circular economy, and today’s announcement is another meaningful step in that direction,” says Peter Vanacker, LYB CEO. “Scaling up our catalytic advanced recycling technology will allow us to return larger volumes of plastic waste back into the value chain. By doing this, we will have the ability to produce more materials for high-quality applications, retaining value of plastics for as long as possible.”

The LYB MoReTec demonstration plant will close the gap for difficult to recycle plastics, such as mixed or flexible materials that are currently sent to landfill or incineration. Source One Plastics, a joint venture of LYB and 23 Oaks Investments formed in October 2022, will supply the majority of the sorted processed feedstock. The advanced recycled feedstock produced by the MoReTec facility will be used for the production of polymers sold by LYB under the  CirculenRevive product line for use in a wide range of applications, including medical and food packaging.

The MoReTec difference

The MoReTec technology produces pyrolysis oil and pyrolysis gas. Pyrolysis oil is a substitute for fossil-based materials used in polymer production.  Typically, pyrolysis gas streams are consumed as a fuel, however, the MoReTec technology enables the pyrolysis gas to be recovered as well, contributing to the production of polymer and displacing fossil-based feedstocks, which lowers direct CO2 emissions. Biodegradable Polymers

In addition, the proprietary catalyst technology lowers the process temperature, reduces energy consumption and improves yield.  With lower energy consumption, the process can be powered by electricity, including electricity from renewable sources at net zero GHG emissions.

These differentiating advantages provide a carbon footprint advantage as well. The recovery of pyrolysis gas as feedstock, lower energy demand, electrical heating design, displacement of fossil-feedstocks, and recovery of waste plastic from incineration or landfill result in a significantly lower carbon footprint compared with fossil-based processes. This makes MoReTec a unique value proposition. Biodegradable Polymers

Biodegradable Polymers

Polestar has officially confirmed the integration of super-fast-charging XFC batteries in its electric cars, solidifying a partnership with StoreDot

Scheduled for availability in 2027, the collaboration promises groundbreaking charging capabilities. While previous speculations hinted at this development, Polestar has now formalized the agreement.

In an unprecedented move, Polestar has entered into an exclusive agreement with StoreDot, an Israeli firm renowned for its expertise in rapid battery charging.

StoreDot recently completed the production of initial XFC (Extreme Fast Charging) battery prototypes and distributed them to 15 automakers for testing.

Polestar, as the pioneering adopter, is set to receive XFC batteries capable of recharging its electric vehicles in just 10 minutes.  Biodegradable Polymers

This revolutionary battery technology is anticipated to debut in Polestar models by 2027, marking a significant advancement in electric vehicle charging efficiency.

Polestar’s CEO, Thomas Ingenlath, expressed enthusiasm about the partnership, stating that StoreDot’s technology will enable rapid recharging of their electric cars within minutes.

Echoing this sentiment, StoreDot’s CEO emphasized the shifting concern from range anxiety to charging anxiety, emphasizing the growing demand for electric vehicles with swift recharge capabilities.

To validate the real-world performance of XFC batteries, StoreDot is actively collaborating with Polestar to integrate the systems into production vehicles and ensure optimal functionality beyond the confines of the laboratory.  Biodegradable Polymers

The remarkable endurance of XFC batteries, demonstrated by consistent 10% to 80% charging in just 10 minutes for over 1,000 cycles without significant performance degradation, underscores the potential of this innovative technology.

Biodegradable Polymers

SANTONI Finalizes Acquisition Of Terrot, A Pivotal Realignment Of The Circular Knitting Machine Industry

Santoni Shanghai Knitting Machinery Co., Ltd., made an appearance at the ITMA Asia + CITME, and is honored to announce that it has received regulatory approval from Chinese authorities for its proposed acquisition of Terrot GmbH, a manufacturer of circular knitting machines in Germany.

The acquisition represents a pivotal step in Santoni’s strategy to advance the circular knitting machine industry. The integration of Terrot into the Santoni ecosystem is projected to increase Santoni’s production capacity and boost its market share, and in conjunction with other strategic objectives, firmly solidify Santoni’s position as the leading manufacturer in the industry, with unrivaled scale, depth of innovation and expertise.

Seeking to meet rising demand for high-end circular knitting products, Santoni has pursued an Ecosystem Strategy in recent years, aiming to unify a highly fragmented industry and enhance innovation, sustainability and digitalization to more effectively meet market needs.  Biodegradable Polymers

The deployment of both parties’ latest innovation practices, textile automation offerings, integrated enterprise services, C2M solutions, and a platform for designers “Materialliance”, will allow Santoni Shanghai and Terrot to connect and bridge demand and offer of circular knitted products, delivering substantial added value to clients.

By incorporating Terrot’s offerings, particularly in the double jersey and jacquard sector, Santoni stands to gain a competitive edge in offering high-efficiency machines known for their superior performance, low maintenance, and cost-effectiveness. Highlighting this shift, Terrot’s patented UCC 572-T will be showcased during ITMA Asia + CITME in the Santoni’s Shanghai premises. This state of the art high-feeder transfer jacquard machine for sports and leisurewear in fine gauges will offer a glimpse into the potential of future collaboration.  Biodegradable Polymers

“I am very excited about today’s announcement,” said Gianpietro Belotti, CEO of Santoni Shanghai. The acquisition of Terrot, including the reputable Pilotelli brand, will allow us to deliver on our commitment to building a stronger, more consolidated global ecosystem capable of yielding a sustained competitive advantage in the circular knitting machine industry. Looking ahead, we aim to cultivate an even more extensive talent pool and solutions portfolio, creating synergies that empower us to deliver a superior knitting experience to our customers.”

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Biodegradable Polymers

Aloxe inaugurates its new recycled PET plastic manufacturing plant in Messein, France

On November 16th, 2023, Aloxe inaugurated its new recycled PET plastic manufacturing plant in Messein. Aloxe’s €25 million investment in this new plant provides a practical, tried-and-tested technological solution that responds immediately to the major challenges of reusing and recycling single-use foodgrade plastic bottles and, more broadly to the environmental transition in France and Europe.  Biodegradable Polymers

On November 16th, 2023, Aloxe inaugurated its new recycled PET plastic manufacturing plant in Messein (Meurthe-et-Moselle), in the presence of Julien Le Goff, Deputy Prefect, Secretary-General of Meurthe-et-Moselle Prefecture, Dominique Potier, MP for Meurthe-et-Moselle, Philippe Bolo, MP for Maine-et-Loire and an expert in this field, Audrey Bardot, VP of Meurthe-et-Moselle Departmental Council, Filipe Pinho, Chairman of the Moselle-Madon Federation of Municipalities, and Daniel Lagrange, Mayor of Messein.

Aloxe’s €25 million investment in this new plant provides a practical, tried-and-tested technological solution that responds immediately to the major challenges of reusing and recycling single-use foodgrade plastic bottles and, more broadly to the environmental transition in France and Europe. In a mere two years, Aloxe has consolidated and accelerated its industrial development in France by opening the largest recycled PET manufacturing plant in the country, increasing its production capacity from 12.5 kt to 50 kt. In 2024, Aloxe will be independent leader in Recycled PET in Europe, with a 120kt capacity in France, Poland and Italy.  Biodegradable Polymers

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Aloxe inaugurates its new recycled PET plastic manufacturing plant in Messein, France

New Method Converts Mixed Plastics Into Biodegradable Polymers

In a groundbreaking development, researchers have introduced a novel method for converting mixed plastics, comprising both traditional and bio-based polymers, into biodegradable alternatives. Traditional recycling processes face challenges when dealing with bio-based plastics like polylactic acid (PLA), as their visual and textural similarity to conventional petroleum-based plastics often leads well-intentioned recyclers to place them in the wrong streams, hindering proper decomposition in composters.

Addressing this issue, a collaborative effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI), and X—the moonshot incubator under Alphabet—has resulted in a “one-pot” technique. This innovative approach utilizes naturally sourced salt solutions and specific microbes within a single container to catalyze the disintegration of mixed plastics into individual molecules called monomers. Subsequently, microbes ferment these monomers, yielding a new form of biodegradable polymer suitable for crafting various products.  Biodegradable Polymers

The simplicity of this method not only sidesteps the intricate separation process but also promises to enhance the environmental impact of the final product. This breakthrough could revolutionize recycling practices, allowing consumers to mix plastic waste without concern. Beyond simplifying recycling, the team envisions a future where bacteria metabolizing plastic monomers can be harnessed for the bio-based production of valuable goods, such as biofuels or pharmaceuticals.

While the researchers, including the recognized engineer Dou, are currently experimenting with different organic salt catalysts to optimize their method’s efficiency and cost-effectiveness, the ultimate goal is to scale up the process for real-world applications in recycling facilities. Biodegradable Polymers

Their recent paper demonstrated the viability of the approach through bench-scale experiments involving common plastics like polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and PLA, showcasing the potential for transforming the approximately 8.3 billion tons of plastic waste in landfills into valuable and sustainable products.

New Method Converts Mixed Plastics Into Biodegradable Polymers

Clariant inaugurates flame retardants plant in China

Clariant formally launched its state-of-the-art manufacturing site for halogen-free flame retardants in Daya Bay, Huizhou, China, said the company.

The USD67 M investment into the site’s first manufacturing line will offer domestic customers with access to new and sustainable Exolit OP flame retardants and associated technical knowhow to back the significant increase of engineering plastics uses in the electrical & electronics and e-mobility segments.

A second line is being constructed and predicted to come online in 2024, representing another investment worth USD44 M.  Biodegradable Polymers

The new facility will manufacture the company’s international series of patent-protected organo-phosphorus flame retardants and supports the capacity of the firm’s two Exolit OP sites in Knapsack, Germany. The team at the One Clariant Campus in Shanghai will back customers in co-development and in-application evaluation.

The site is run by 100 workers and is situated within the Huizhou Daya Bay Economic and Technological Development Zone (Daya Bay Chem Park) in Guangdong Province. The Daya Bay site of Clariant uses green electricity, allowing a significant decrease in Scope 2 (CO2) emissions.

Clariant inaugurates flame retardants plant in China

DOE to award up to $3.5B more to support domestic battery manufacturing

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced up to $3.5 billion from the Infrastructure Law to boost domestic production of advanced batteries and battery materials nationwide.

The high-capacity battery supply chain consists of five main steps including: (1) raw material production; (2) materials processing including material refinement and processing; (3) battery material /component manufacturing and cell fabrication; (4) battery pack and end use product manufacturing, and (5) battery end-of-life and recycling. This FOA aims to reach across both the midstream and downstream segments of the battery supply chain, supporting both midstream battery materials and component manufacturing, as well as subsequent cell manufacturing and end of life recycling.

This investment, which includes a focus on retaining and creating good-paying union jobs in the manufacturing workforce, is administered by DOE’s Office of Manufacturing and Energy Supply Chains (MESC).  Biodegradable Polymers

With the demand for electric vehicles (EVs) and stationary storage alone projected to increase the size of the lithium battery market by five- to ten-fold by the end of the decade, it is essential that the United States invests in the capacity to accelerate the development of a resilient supply chain for high-capacity batteries, including non-lithium batteries, the DOE said.

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DOE to award up to $3.5B more to support domestic battery manufacturing

Plastic recycled – Judge says Ottawa listing plastic items as toxic was ‘unreasonable and unconstitutional’ 21-11-2023

Biodegradable Polymers

Hydrogen Cars – Recover™ And Valdese Weavers Partner For Circularity In The Home Textiles Industry 11-11-2023

Hydrogen Cars

Do Hydrogen Cars Waste Water?

In recent years, hydrogen-powered cars have gained attention as a potential solution to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and combat climate change. These vehicles use hydrogen fuel cells to generate electricity, emitting only water vapor as a byproduct. However, a common question arises: do hydrogen cars waste water? Let’s explore this topic and shed light on the matter.

Hydrogen Cars and Water Consumption

Contrary to popular belief, hydrogen cars do not waste water. The water vapor emitted from the tailpipe of a hydrogen car is a byproduct of the chemical reaction that occurs within the fuel cell. This reaction combines hydrogen fuel with oxygen from the air, resulting in the production of electricity and water vapor. Therefore, the water vapor released is simply a natural consequence of the car’s operation and does not contribute to water waste.  Hydrogen Cars

Water Recycling in Hydrogen Cars

It is important to note that hydrogen cars have a water recycling system in place. This system collects and recycles the water vapor produced during the vehicle’s operation. The collected water is then reused within the fuel cell, ensuring a closed-loop system that minimizes water consumption. This recycling process further emphasizes the efficiency and sustainability of hydrogen cars.

FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Can the water emitted by hydrogen cars be used for other purposes?
A: The water vapor emitted by hydrogen cars is generally in small quantities and not suitable for use in other applications. It is primarily released into the atmosphere as harmless water vapor.  Hydrogen Cars

Q: How does the water recycling system in hydrogen cars work?
A: The water recycling system in hydrogen cars collects the water vapor emitted during operation, purifies it, and reintroduces it into the fuel cell. This closed-loop system ensures minimal water consumption.

Q: Are hydrogen cars more water-efficient than traditional combustion engine cars?
A: Yes, hydrogen cars are more water-efficient than traditional combustion engine cars. While traditional cars emit pollutants and do not generate water as a byproduct, hydrogen cars produce only water vapor, making them environmentally friendly.

In conclusion, hydrogen cars do not waste water.  Hydrogen Cars

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Hydrogen Cars

Recover™ And Valdese Weavers Partner For Circularity In The Home Textiles Industry

November 9, 2023Valdese Weavers, a producer of decorative textiles in the United States for residential and contract markets, has partnered with global recycled cotton fiber producer, Recover™, to transform the home textile industry. The two innovative textile leaders, both at different stages of the supply chain, intend to capitalize on their combined expertise to drive the use of sustainable materials in the industry.

Valdese Weavers has more than 100 years of textile experience and works with a full range of furniture manufacturers, distributors, and retailers to deliver unparalleled design through their vertical manufacturing facilities. The company understands the importance of choosing responsible raw materials, and already offers a collection of environmentally conscious products. By partnering with Recover™, they can offer the highest quality decorative fabrics made with RCS/GRS verified Recover™ recycled fiber and help brands and retailers to reduce their environmental impact caused by virgin raw material production.  Hydrogen Cars

Blake Millinor, President and CEO of Valdese Weavers, commented: “We are proud to partner with Recover™ as a natural fiber platform for our customers searching for sustainable fabrics. Recover™ compliments our sustainable product offering by helping create a more circular material solution. We are excited to be working with the Recover™ team to tell this unique story and develop more responsible textile solutions for our customers”.

Recover™ has perfected the art and science of scaled production of recycled cotton fiber over more than 75 years, and today, the company is supported by leading institutional investors including STORY3 Capital, Goldman Sachs, Fortress Investment Group and Eldridge Industries.  Hydrogen Cars

Its recycled cotton fiber is fundamentally transforming the textile industry, making significant environmental savings compared to virgin and organic cotton, and it is one of the most sought-after fibers in the recycled materials space. The integration of Recover™ fiber into Valdese Weaver’s product lines, enables the textile mill to remain frontrunners in delivering sustainable and innovative fabrics, and accelerate the production of low-impact products such as sofas, cushions, and curtains.

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Hydrogen Cars

Amcor to source mechanically recycled polyethylene from NOVA Chemicals

The multiyear collaboration will focus on the incorporation of mechanically recycled polyethylene resin in flexible packaging films.

Amcor has unveiled a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with sustainable polyethene producer Nova Chemicals Corporati  Hydrogen Cars

This multiyear collaboration focuses on Amcor’s commitment to circular content, emphasising the incorporation of mechanically recycled polyethene resin (rPE) in flexible packaging films.

Fuelling circular content with SYNDIGO rPE resin

The heart of this collaboration lies in the supply agreement that positions Amcor to procure SYNDIGO rPE resin.  Hydrogen Cars

This resin, scheduled to be produced at NOVA Chemicals’ mechanical recycling facility in Connersville, Indiana, is anticipated to commence operations as early as 2025.

Amcor flexibles North America president Fred Stephan expressed enthusiasm, stating: “This is an exciting opportunity for us to supplement our rPE supply as we strive to achieve a 30% recycled material usage across our global portfolio by 2030.”

Driving sustainable practices

Amcor’s strategic move aligns with its global vision to foster sustainability and packaging circularity.  Hydrogen Cars

By integrating rPE into flexible packaging films, the company aims to assist brand owners in meeting recycled content targets, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and actively contributing to the preservation of the environment.

NOVA circular solutions vice-president Greg DeKunder shared the sentiment, stating: “Reshaping plastics for a better future will take collaboration within our industry, and we share Amcor’s commitment to further global packaging circularity.”

NOVA Chemicals’ expansion to propel circular solutions

In parallel, NOVA Chemicals unveiled plans to expand its recycling footprint across North America in the coming years.  Hydrogen Cars

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Hydrogen Cars

Honda, Mitsubishi Chemical Develop Colored Acrylic Resin for Car Bodies

Article-Honda, Mitsubishi Chemical Develop Colored Acrylic Resin for Car Bodies

Mitsubishi Chemical and Honda Motor are jointly developing a PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate acrylic) acrylic compound for automotive body components such as doors and front fenders. Two concept models — the Sustaina-C and Pocket concept cars — using these materials are exhibited at the Honda booth in the Japan Mobility Show 2023 which concludes on Nov. 5, 2023, in Tokyo.  Hydrogen Cars

Painted steel is the most commonly used material for automobile bodies, but Mitsubishi Chemical and Honda aim to transform the status quo by developing a new acrylic resin material that can be adopted for doors, hoods, fenders, and other automotive body parts. The compound is composed of acrylic resin and rubber particles to improve the impact resistance required for automobile bodies.

Acrylic resins are highly transparent and can be toned to a variety of colors, enabling manufacturers to create glossy surfaces simply by adding colorants. It also helps reduce CO2 emissions generated in the painting process.  Hydrogen Cars

Furthermore, acrylic resin is suitable for recycling because it can be decomposed into acrylic raw materials at high yields by heating. With a view to starting operation of a recycling plant in fiscal 2025, Mitsubishi Chemical aims to commercialize an acrylic resin molecular recycling business. Closed-loop recycling trials conducted in collaboration with Honda and Microwave Chemical Co. Ltd. have yielded recycled products comparable in quality to conventional products. Mitsubishi Chemical expects to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through this technology over the entire product life cycle by about 50% compared with current practices.  Hydrogen Cars

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Honda, Mitsubishi Chemical Develop Colored Acrylic Resin for Car Bodies

The tech to recycle clothes is only just being invented

The vast waste and pollution caused by the fashion industry has made recycling clothes a top priority, but only now are simple tasks like pulling the sole off a shoe being done by machines.

CETIA, a company in the southwest of France is finally offering some mechanical solutions to the challenges of recycling clothes.

Its research team has invented a machine that uses artificial intelligence to scan garments, identify hard elements like zippers and buttons, and use a laser to cut them out.  Hydrogen Cars

It has also built a machine that grabs shoes in a large mechanical arm and yanks off the soles.

In a world of space travel and vaccines, that may seem a relatively rudimentary piece of technology, but it had simply never been done before.

“It was a chicken and egg question. No one was recycling soles because we couldn’t separate them from the shoe, and no one was separating them because there was no recycling,” said Chloe Salmon Legagneur, director of CETIA.

Previously, recyclers had to bake the shoes for many hours to melt the glue and then pull the sole off by hand.  Hydrogen Cars

“There’s nothing spectacular in what we’ve done,” Legagneur said. “But we’ve done it.”

For now, barely one percent of textiles in Europe are turned back into new clothes. Most end up as housing insulation, padding or asphalt for paving roads.

That is because clothes are usually a complex mix of materials that must be separated carefully to keep the fibers in good condition if there is any hope of respinning them into new garments.

Usually done by hand, CETIA says its AI-laser machine can do this at a much faster rate that is rapidly evolving as it perfects the technology.

It also has machines that can sort clothes by color and composition at a rate of one per second.

The reason these inventions are finally emerging is that tough new European rules are imminent that will force clothing companies to use a set amount of recycled fibers in their garments.  Hydrogen Cars

CETIA’s work is backed by big retailers like Decathlon and Zalando who are urgently looking for industrial-scale solutions.

There are also political incentives. The French government sees the potential for new manufacturing jobs if recycling technology allows it to deal with some of the 200,000 tonnes of textile waste currently being shipped abroad each year.

CETIA’s focus is on preparing textiles for reuse. Other companies must now start melting down the separated soles and turning them into new ones.

But it is an important first step.  Hydrogen Cars

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The tech to recycle clothes is only just being invented

Is Piovan Using Too Much Debt?

The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway’s Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says ‘The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.’ So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. We can see that Piovan S.p.A.  does use debt in its business. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy.  Hydrogen Cars

Ultimately, if the company can’t fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well – and to its own advantage. The first step when considering a company’s debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

How Much Debt Does Piovan Carry?

As you can see below, Piovan had €174.0m of debt, at June 2023, which is about the same as the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. However, because it has a cash reserve of €73.8m, its net debt is less, at about €100.3m.  Hydrogen Cars

A Look At Piovan’s Liabilities

According to the last reported balance sheet, Piovan had liabilities of €207.6m due within 12 months, and liabilities of €140.0m due beyond 12 months. Offsetting this, it had €73.8m in cash and €106.4m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities total €167.4m more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

While this might seem like a lot, it is not so bad since Piovan has a market capitalization of €469.5m, and so it could probably strengthen its balance sheet by raising capital if it needed to. But it’s clear that we should definitely closely examine whether it can manage its debt without dilution.  Hydrogen Cars

In order to size up a company’s debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Piovan has a low net debt to EBITDA ratio of only 1.5. And its EBIT covers its interest expense a whopping 30.6 times over. So you could argue it is no more threatened by its debt than an elephant is by a mouse. On top of that, Piovan grew its EBIT by 69% over the last twelve months, and that growth will make it easier to handle its debt. There’s no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is Piovan’s earnings that will influence how the balance sheet holds up in the future. So when considering debt, it’s definitely worth looking at the earnings trend.  Hydrogen Cars

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, Piovan recorded free cash flow worth 76% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This cold hard cash means it can reduce its debt when it wants to.

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Is Piovan Using Too Much Debt?

Chlorophyll Water launches 100% rPET bottles with Clean Flake technology

Chlorophyll Water has transitioned to bottles made from 100% rPET with Clean Flake technology. These rPET bottles are manufactured from food-grade PET which is recycled as per the technologies approved by the US FDA and European Food Safety Authority (Efsa) for food-grade recycled material and repurposed into new PET bottles.

“As a brand, Chlorophyll Water is committed to sustainability and implementation of new ideas and technology which can improve the impact that packaging has on our environment,” explains founder Matt Levine, “in utilising bottles made from 100% recycled plastic, our intention is to make a meaningful environmental impact – addressing the plastic waste challenge, minimising our use of virgin, fossil-fuel based packaging.”

To accompany their bottle made from 100% recycled plastic, Chlorophyll Water selected Avery Dennison’s Clean Flake label technology as their label to help improve the yield of high-quality, food grade PET in the recycling process.  Hydrogen Cars

The technology is built on a water-based adhesive technology that is claimed to separate cleanly from PET during the caustic wash stage of the recycling process.

Chlorophyll Water is a plant-powered purified water enhanced by nature with the addition of Chlorophyll, a key ingredient and the distinct green pigment in plant life. It is carbon-filtered using triple filtration and is UV-treated for a high level of purity.

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Chlorophyll Water launches 100% rPET bottles with Clean Flake technology

Circular Textiles – One million tonnes of plastic additives pollute the world’s oceans each year 10-11-2023

Hydrogen Cars

Circular Textiles – One million tonnes of plastic additives pollute the world’s oceans each year 10-11-2023

Circular Textiles

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Automation – Sorting the Circular Textiles Gap

Advanced technologies for the classification and pre-processing of waste garments are now an urgent requirement, as the textile industry looks to close the loop. All the indications are that by 2030, recycling will have become a much bigger part of the global picture, and automation has a major role to play, especially in sorting and pre-processing.

Automated processes are already highly developed all along the global textile and garment manufacturing chain. Circular Textiles

The supply chain is, however, still strictly linear, while being highly complex – spanning from fibres to finished garments and still involving tremendous waste and many unnecessary transportation steps globally on the route from the first chemical processing plants or cotton fields to the shelves of High Street stores.

In addition to continuing to address these issues, the supply chain will now very quickly have to become more circular, as legislation closes in and changes things dramatically.

New Restrictions

There is an immediate need for advanced new technologies that can close the loop for the collection, sorting and pre-processing of waste garments, in order for recycling to be further developed, especially in the European Union (EU), which will be first in imposing new restrictions. Circular Textiles

As previously reported by Fibre2Fashion, over seven million tons of waste textiles is being mandated to be separately collected each year within the EU from 2025. It will be paid for by the brands who put product into the market via the new Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) scheme, and this waste is no longer eligible to be landfilled, incinerated or moved on to other countries. As such, it will create a 32 million-ton mountain of new waste by 2030 without immediate action.

Worn Again Technologies

The huge challenge this poses was emphasised by a number of speakers at the 62nd Dornbirn Global Manmade Fibers (GFC) conference held in Austria from September 13-15, including Toby Moss, director of business development for Worn Again Technologies. Circular Textiles

Worn Again Technologies has raised funding of some €42.9 million to support the construction of its new textile chemical recycling demonstration plant in Winterthur, Switzerland, and counts Sulzer, Oerlikon and fashion retailer H&M among its key strategic investors.

The demonstration plant will be opened in 2025 and will recycle fibres from hard-to-recycle fabric blends using a solvent-based process, with an annual capacity of 1,000 tons. (Just for context, annual global fibre consumption is currently 120 million tons.)

Licensing model

Worn Again, however, is a technology licensing company and does not plan to build its own facilities, but is working with technology partners who will quickly build much larger-scale commercial plants. Circular Textiles

The first of these is expected to come onstream in Europe and have annual capacities of approximately 50,000 tons per annum by as early as 2027-28, when feedstock streams from waste textiles have sufficiently built up.

“At the moment, most current recyclers are focused on post-industrial waste, but demand will soon outstrip supply, which will lead to a rush into post-consumer textile waste,” Moss said. “At the same time, recycling capacity is not yet growing as fast as demand, while bottle companies are getting a lot better at bottle collection so a lot of rPET from bottles currently used in textile production will not be available. As a result, recycled content in textiles is likely to go down rather than up for a period and this indicates some healthy price premiums for the first companies producing recycled PET polyester fibres with the same performance as virgin fibres.”  Circular Textiles

As with many other current recycling technologies being developed and planning industrial upscaling in the near future, success is in part hinged on the collection and sorting of waste clothing becoming much more sophisticated – and quickly.

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Circular Textiles

UK-based Colorifix aims to bring environmentally friendly fabric-dyeing solution to China and Southeast Asia in 2025

  • Biotech start-up will focus on markets in India and Sri Lanka next year, before making its move to China and Southeast Asia
  • Production life-cycle using its solution can help reduce carbon emission by 31 per cent, water consumption by 77 per cent and chemical usage by 80 per cent

Colorifix, a finalist for Prince William’s Earthshot prize, aims to bring its environmentally friendly fabric-dyeing solution to markets in China and Southeast Asia in 2025 to help tackle pollution in the garment manufacturing industry.  Circular Textiles

The biotech start-up uses DNA sequences from nature and microorganisms to create pigments that can be fixed onto fabrics in a way that significantly reduces water and chemical usage, as well as the carbon footprint in the dyeing process.

The UK firm will make its foray into the Asian markets from the first half of next year, starting with India, the world’s fifth-largest producer of textiles, and Sri Lanka, according to its chief operating officer Christopher Hunter. The firm is still in “very early stages” of establishing its presence in China, he added.

“China is a very important market for textiles,” Hunter said in a video interview on Tuesday. Circular Textiles

“We are aware that there are increasing environmental targets for the industry in China, which might in some way accelerate our entry. It won’t be before 2025.”

China announced in April last year that it aimed to recycle 25 per cent of its textile waste and churn out 2 million tonnes of recycled fibre by 2025, part of its big push to achieve peak carbon emissions by 2030 and carbon neutrality by 2060. That included promoting green and low-carbon production in the textile industry.

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Circular Textiles

The battery is the key factor for electric cars’ convenience and affordability. The battery is also the main source of anxiety and doubt for many drivers

It is obvious that the high price of electric cars is related to the battery.

Let’s see why. Electric cars: the battery determines the economic difference Electric cars are gradually winning over drivers, especially in Italy, that the energy transition is possible on a large scale.  Circular Textiles

However, the electric transition imposed by the European Union in a short time is not very encouraging for the switch from thermal engines to electric ones.

What makes electric cars less attractive is the high cost of eco-friendly vehicles, which are on average between 10,000 and 15,000 euros more expensive than a combustion car in the same segment and, as expected, not everyone can afford them.

How can the costs be lowered and what are they mainly due to? The answer is simple: to the batteries.  Circular Textiles

Andy Palmer, former operations director of Nissan and responsible for the first Leaf, confirmed this and also predicted a drop in prices in the next few years.

Cheap electric cars: we need smaller batteries and a change of mentality Andy Palmer, former operations director of Nissan, provided the solution to lower the costs of electric cars.

He said: “The solution for an affordable electric vehicle is not to wait for the technology to mature, it’s not necessarily playing with the chemistry: it’s simply using a smaller battery. But to have a smaller battery you need charging infrastructure, that’s the key.

A decent charging network including home chargers probably has around 15 million charging points and we are a long way from that at the moment.

Unless an effective infrastructure is achieved quickly, people will not naturally transition to electric vehicles.  Circular Textiles

People will continue to mention range anxiety and you won’t change that mindset. With a ubiquitous network, people won’t worry so much about battery life, they’ll know they can always plug into a charger and that’s when a smaller battery can be accepted.

That’s when you get the transformation.” However, not only a technical change is needed, but also a mental one by the consumers, as David Greenwood, expert in advanced propulsion systems at the Warwick Manufacturing Group, explained: “The key is not to buy an EV with more battery capacity than you need, if you spend a fortune on a car capable of 500 miles and then only drive 10 miles a day, you’re paying for the battery and all the systems, but not you will save on fuel to cover them.  Circular Textiles

A manufacturer could make three different module models and assemble them into eight different models to achieve economies of scale at the module level.

Something that would allow us to obtain economies of scale and introduce much larger cells.

While in the early days batteries like Tesla’s contained thousands of small cells, the future will see batteries containing hundreds of much larger cells.”

Circular Textiles

Korean petrochemical firms ramp up carbon fiber production

The South Korean petrochemical industry is ramping up the production of carbon fiber, a part of its focus on high value-added businesses to develop mid- to long-term growth engines amid a prolonged slump in the market.  Circular Textiles
According to multiple industry sources on Tuesday, Hyosung Advanced Materials Corp. plans to expand its carbon fiber production capacity, which currently stands at 9,000 tons per year, to 16,500 in 2024, 21,500 tons in 2025, and 24,000 tons by 2028.

The company has also decided to establish a new carbon fiber production entity, Hyosung Vina Core Materials Co., in Ba Ria-Vung Tau Province in southern Vietnam.
Toray Advanced Materials Korea Inc. also recently held a groundbreaking ceremony for the expansion of its carbon fiber unit 3 in Gumi City, North Gyeongsang Province.

The company plans to expand its annual carbon fiber production capacity to 8,000 tons by 2025 from 4,700 tons.  Circular Textiles
Carbon fiber is called “super fiber” as it weighs one-fourth of iron but is over 10 times stronger.

Demand is growing in many areas, including compressed natural gas (CNG), compressed hydrogen storage, automotive parts, and wind blades.

The market for carbon fiber, also dubbed the “rice of the future,” is expected to grow at nearly 10 percent on average annually.
Global demand for polyacrylonitrile (PAN) carbon fiber is expected to increase to 327,000 tons in 2035 from 112,000 tons in 2023, according to Japanese market research firm Fuji Keizai Co.  Circular Textiles
The recent decisions by petrochemical companies to enter the carbon fiber business come as they seek growth engines with high value-added products amid a sluggish market. Hyosung Advanced Materials, whose flagship product is tire reinforcement materials, posted sales of 783.3 billion won ($597.03 million) in the third quarter, down 20 percent from a year ago, and an operating profit of 35.7 billion won, down 46 percent.

Sales of tire reinforcements and seat belts and airbags fell 29 percent and 15 percent respectively from a year earlier to 426.5 billion won and 141.3 billion won each. The decline is likely due to the slowdown in the automotive industry.
Meanwhile, the carbon and aramid fiber segments saw solid demand and posted an 11 percent increase in sales that hit 90.7 billion won during the period.
The securities industry forecasts that Hyosung Advanced Materials’ operating profit from the carbon fiber segment will outperform that of the tire reinforcement business from the second half of 2024.  Circular Textiles
Increased solar power generation is also driving demand for carbon fiber. Recently, carbon fiber has been in demand for insulation materials used to produce polysilicon and ingots, which are key value chains in the solar industry.
Ceramic was used for insulation previously but is being replaced by carbon fiber for its short replacement cycle.
Hyosung Advanced Materials’ carbon fiber brand TANSOME? 

Coca Cola, Nestlé face scrutiny on recycled bottles claims

 

Dutch consumer watchdog Consumentenbond has joined European consumer organisation Beuc and other groups from 12 EU countries in a legal complaint against food and drink giants Coca Cola, Danone and Nestlé for misleading claims about recycling plastic bottles.
The groups on Tuesday filed a case to the European Commission and consumer protection authorities’ network CPC calling for an investigation into claims that plastic water bottles sold across Europe are ‘100% recyclable’ or ‘100% recycled’.  Circular Textiles

They also denounced the use of images suggesting that plastic bottles have no impact on the environment. The groups argue such claims are “factually incorrect” and do not comply with EU rules as they mislead consumers.

The recycling rate for PET plastic bottles is estimated to be 55% across the EU and the likelihood of it becoming a bottle again is around 30%, the groups say.

The claims also do not consider that virgin materials can be added during manufacturing and parts of a plastic water bottle, such as lids and labels, cannot be made from recycled plastic.  Circular Textiles

Drinks bottles are one of the top sources of plastic pollution on European beaches, the organisations noted and in October Dutch government inspectors said that the private sector is not doing enough to make sure more plastic bottles are collected.

“Using 100% recycled or recyclable claims or displaying nature images and green visuals that insinuate that plastic is environmentally friendly is misleading consumers.

Such claims however can be found on many bottles sold across Europe.

The problem is that there’s no guarantee it will be fully recycled once it’s in the bin,” said Beuc deputy director Ursula Pachl.  Circular Textiles

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Coca Cola, Nestlé face scrutiny on recycled bottles claims

One million tonnes of plastic additives pollute the world’s oceans each year

A new study has revealed that approximately one million tonnes of plastic additives leak into the planet’s oceans every year.

The report – conducted by EA Earth Action – reveals the scale of pollution caused by these chemicals on an annual basis, with the organisation warning that, without substantial changes to production and waste management, the leakage of plastic additives into oceans and waterways could increase by over 50 per cent by 2040.

The study – entitled ‘Adding It Up’ – further highlights that a significant portion of this pollution – approximately 116 kilotonnes – originates from plastic packaging materials alone.  Circular Textiles

EA Earth Action stresses the potential dangers this could pose to human health – the vast majority of additives found are untested, unregulated and have been linked to various health conditions such as obesity, cancer and fertility issues.

Everyday items such as textiles or vehicle tires provided a considerable contribution to the leakage into oceans at 37 and 35 kilotonnes respectively.

Publishing the findings ahead of the third session of the UN Global Plastic Treaty Negotiations (INC-3) – aimed at formulating a legally binding international treaty to tackle plastic pollution – EA Earth Action is calling for increased transparency on the composition of plastic products alongside the scaling of effective waste management practices across the globe.  Circular Textiles

Julien Boucher, Founder of EA Earth Action commented: “The findings of our report underscore the urgency of adopting a comprehensive approach to confront the challenge of plastic pollution and combat additive leakage effectively.

“The widespread inclusion of potentially harmful additives in plastics, combined with substantial amounts of mismanaged plastic waste worldwide, has created the toxic threat we face today.

“Addressing the problem with additives must be a key talking point at INC-3 if we are to protect the ecosystem and human health from its detrimental effects. Further research into these chemical compounds is critical to addressing the threats from the whole spectrum of plastic pollution.”  Circular Textiles

Calls to reduce plastic additives in oceans

EA Earth Action is calling on policymakers to select materials that are both more reusable and recyclable to help tackle the plastics crisis and drive towards a more circular economy.

The organisation has also called for further research on how and why plastic additives leak into the environment and the effects this has on the human body to enable governments worldwide to construct more effective prevention strategies.

Maria Westerbos, Founder of the Plastic Soup Foundation and Co-founder of the Plastic Healthy Council said: “The results of EA Earth Action’s Adding it up report are a sobering reminder of how additives toxify both our planet and our bodies. We should never forget that all these chemicals are added to plastics and, in that way, are released into the entire ecosystem, including our own bodies. We now must see action.”

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One million tonnes of plastic additives pollute the world’s oceans each year

APR and RecyClass Work to Align Design for Recycling Guidance
Continued efforts to drive harmonization of plastic packaging recyclability

The Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) recently announced updates to the APR Design® Guide for Plastic Recyclability to align with RecyClass, the European based non-profit initiative focused on advancing plastics circularity. The APR Design® Guide will now state that 6% of EVOH is allowed for HDPE containers.  Circular Textiles

“Because the recycling process is very similar in both geographies, packaging will likely be processed similarly,” said Curt Cozart, APR COO. “Although some differences exist, APR Design® Guidance is nearly the same as RecyClass. The APR® Design Guide previously allowed for 5% EVOH in HDPE containers but will update to 6% to align with RecyClass Design for Recycling Guidelines.”

Through their respective Technical Committees, APR and RecyClass are accelerating global alignment of recyclability principles. In these groups, scientific data, gathered based on standardized testing protocols, is shared and serves as the base for discussions on uncovering the complexities of plastic packaging.  Circular Textiles

In addition to guidance on the use of EVOH in HDPE containers, guidance on the use of EVOH in PP containers has also been streamlined through this collaboration.

“To achieve a truly circular future for plastics, harmonization is essential,” commented Paolo Glerean, Chairman of RecyClass. “The real value of the collaboration between APR and RecyClass is evident in these latest recommendations, providing clearer guidance to the plastics industry globally. These joint efforts will allow the plastic packaging value chain to standardize their products on a larger scale and make the path towards the circular use of plastics more cost efficient.”

This activity is part of a continued effort between APR and RecyClass to reinforce their collaboration to drive worldwide harmonization of recyclability for all plastic packaging types, through a shared vision of science-based design for recycling guidelines and protocols for recyclability assessments.  Circular Textiles

This partnership will drive a unified, fact-based approach to recyclability, and bring clarity to the whole value chain.

The harmonization efforts are underway, taking into consideration the variations in recycling capabilities and infrastructure between the two regions.

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APR and RecyClass Work to Align Design for Recycling Guidance Continued efforts to drive harmonization of plastic packaging recyclability

Flake sorting –  Demystifying Chemical Recycling: An Emerging Solution or a New Set of Challenges? 09-11-2023

Circular Textiles

Plastic Pollution – EU launches trade attack against China in a war it can’t win  10-10-2023

Plastic Pollution

Crude Oil Prices Trend 

Crude Oil Prices Trend by Polyestertime

Crude Oil Prices Trend by Polyestertime

Plastic Recycling Technology: A Solution for the Plastic Pollution Crisis

Plastic is one of the most widely used materials in the world, but it also poses a serious threat to the environment and human health. Every year, more than 380 million tonnes of plastic are produced globally, but only 9% of it is recycled into new plastics. The rest ends up in landfills, incinerators, or the oceans, where it can harm wildlife, ecosystems, and human health.

To tackle this problem, scientists and engineers are developing new ways to recycle plastic waste more efficiently and sustainably. One of these methods is chemical recycling, which involves breaking down plastic molecules into smaller units that can be used as raw materials for new products.  Plastic Pollution

Q   How does chemical recycling work?

A.  Unlike mechanical recycling, which melts and reshapes plastic waste into new products without changing its chemical structure, chemical recycling transforms plastic waste into different substances. There are several types of chemical recycling technologies, such as pyrolysis, gasification, hydro-cracking, and depolymerisation.

Pyrolysis is a process that heats plastic waste in the absence of oxygen, producing a mixture of gases, liquids, and solids. The gases and liquids can be used as fuels or feedstocks for making new plastics or other chemicals. The solids can be used as carbon black, a material used in tyres, rubber products, and ink.

Gasification is a process that converts plastic waste into a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, known as syngas. Syngas can be used to generate electricity or to produce synthetic fuels or chemicals.  Plastic Pollution

Hydro-cracking is a process that uses hydrogen and a catalyst to break down plastic waste into smaller hydrocarbon molecules, such as propane or ethane. These molecules can be used as fuels or feedstocks for making new plastics or other chemicals.

Depolymerisation is a process that reverses the polymerisation reaction that forms plastics from monomers. Monomers are the building blocks of plastics, such as ethylene or terephthalate. By using heat, pressure, or catalysts, depolymerisation breaks down plastic waste into its original monomers, which can be purified and reused to make new plastics.

Q    What are the benefits of chemical recycling?

A.  Chemical recycling offers several advantages over mechanical recycling. First, it can recycle plastics that are difficult or impossible to recycle mechanically, such as mixed or contaminated plastics, multilayer plastics, or plastics with additives or colours. Second, it can produce high-quality recycled materials that have similar properties to virgin materials, avoiding the loss of quality or performance that often occurs with mechanical recycling.  Plastic Pollution

Third, it can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by saving energy and resources that would otherwise be used to produce new plastics from fossil fuels.Q

Q    What are the challenges of chemical recycling?

A.  Chemical recycling also faces some challenges that need to be overcome before it can be widely adopted. One of them is the high cost and energy consumption of the processes, which depend on the type and quality of the plastic waste and the desired output. Another challenge is the availability and accessibility of suitable plastic waste streams that can be collected and sorted for chemical recycling. A third challenge is the regulation and standardisation of chemical recycling processes and products, which vary across different countries and regions.  Plastic Pollution

Q    How can chemical recycling help solve the plastic pollution crisis?

A.  Chemical recycling is not a silver bullet that can solve the plastic pollution crisis alone. It needs to be combined with other strategies, such as reducing plastic production and consumption, improving plastic design and quality, enhancing mechanical recycling systems and infrastructure, promoting circular economy principles and practices, and raising awareness and education among consumers and stakeholders.

However, chemical recycling can play an important role in closing the loop of plastic waste management and creating a more sustainable future for plastics.

By transforming plastic waste into valuable resources that can be reused again and again, chemical recycling can help reduce environmental impacts, conserve natural resources, create new economic opportunities, and support innovation and development in the plastics industry.  Plastic Pollution

References:

1 Recycling technologies • Plastics Europe

2 The world’s first ‘infinite’ plastic – BBC Future

3 Plastic Recycling Technology: What are the Environmental Benefits …

4 Plastic pollution: how chemical recycling technology could help fix it

5 New process could enable more efficient plastics recycling

Plastic Pollution

EU launches trade attack against China in a war it can’t win

The European Union is preparing new anti-China measures. BYD is sticking Tesla to the crown, but sales are also increasing at other Chinese EV builders. The large state-owned enterprises are investing heavily in emerging high-tech sectors. Human-like robots are in the spotlight, but the gaming sector is also catching up on the AI road. We end with a chips section.  Plastic Pollution

As part of its economic security strategy, the EU Commission has unveiled 4 technologies in which it seeks to de-crist: advanced semiconductors, artificial intelligence, quantum technologies and biotechnology. Although China is not mentioned in particular, it is clear who is targeted. The Commission is now going to flea by the end of the year to what extent the 27 Member States are exposed to risks. Ultimately, restrictions could be placed on the export or investment of European companies in high-tech sub-sectors that are classified as high risk. By next spring, four other technologies would be eligible. It involves advanced connectivity, navigation and digital technology-including IoT and blockchain-advanced sensor technology, space and propulsion technology, energy technology, robotics and advanced materials. of SCMP    Plastic Pollution

EU Commissioner for Justice Reynders has revealed on the French BFM TV that the Commission is considering a similar investigation of the windmills by analogy with the investigation into government support for electric vehicles. Interest association WindEurope has been complaining stone and leg over Chinese competition FT for some time

The European Parliament, for its part, has approved an ‘anti-compulsive’ instrument that would allow Brussels to impose tariffs, quotas, export controls or market frostbites on countries that are believed to engage in economic harassment.

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Plastic Pollution

Toray Expanding European Carbon Fiber Production Facilities

Toray Industries, Inc., announced that it has decided to expand French subsidiary Toray Carbon Fibers Europe S.A.’s production facilities for regular tow* medium- and high-modulus carbon fibers. This move will increase annual capacity at the Abidos plant (South-West France) from 5,000 metric tons annually, to 6,000 metric tons. Production is expected to start in 2025.  Plastic Pollution
Demand for medium- and high-modulus carbon fibers is rising in Europe, driven by a push to move towards a net-zero society. This growth is mainly due to higher build rates for commercial aircrafts (secondary structures and engines), as well as centrifuge for energy production, satellites, and high-end automobiles. By boosting carbon fiber production capacity in Europe, Toray is responding to its customers’ demand for medium and high-modulus carbon fibers, as befits the market leader.

Toray has made sustainable growth pivotal to Project AP-G 2025, its medium-term management program. Accordingly, the company has developed solutions to tackle climate change with its carbon fiber composite materials. Toray will fully leverage its resources to help achieve a carbon-neutral economy by 2050, in keeping with its corporate philosophy of contributing to society by creating new value.  Plastic Pollution

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Plastic Pollution

 World plastic production and consumption per capita

Plastic recycling is the process of recovering plastic waste and transforming it into new products.    Plastic Pollution

There are different methods of plastic recycling, such as mechanical, chemical and direct recycling1. Here is a brief overview of each method:

The plastic recycling metric ton by 2022 is not easy to estimate, as there are different sources and methods of measuring plastic waste and recycling.

We can resume so :

As you can see, these estimates vary widely depending on the data source and methodology used. Therefore, it is important to be cautious and critical when interpreting these numbers, and to consider the uncertainties and limitations involved in measuring plastic waste and recycling.  Plastic Pollution

World plastic production and consumption per capita

Saudi Arabia, Russia to continue voluntary oil cuts

Saudi Arabia and Russia said they were continuing voluntary oil cuts to year end as tightening supply and rising demand support oil prices,said Reuters.

The Saudi and Russian statements come hours before a ministerial monitoring panel of the OPEC+ group of leading oil producers convenes online later on Wednesday. The panel, called the Joint Ministerial Monitoring Committee, can call for a full OPEC+ meeting if warranted but sources have told Reuters it is unlikely to tweak current oil output policy.

Oil prices continued a downward trend directly following the news with Brent futures falling $1 to $89.92 a barrel but they were trading at $90.40 a barrel by 0854 GMT. OPEC+, which comprises the countries of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and leading allies including Russia, has been cutting output since last year in what it says is preemptive action to maintain market stability.  Plastic Pollution

The U.S. and Western allies have argued that the world needs lower prices to support economic growth and the global economy. Saudi Arabia, the OPEC de facto leader, said it would continue with its voluntary oil output cut of one million barrels per day (bpd) for the month of November and until the end of the year and that it would review the decision again next month.

The kingdom’s production for November and December will be approximately 9 million bpd, the energy ministry said in a statement. “This voluntary cut decision will be reviewed next month to consider deepening the cut or increasing production,” the statement said.

Saudi Arabia first implemented the additional voluntary cut in July and has been renewing it monthly. It said in September the cut would last until year end but would be reviewed on a monthly basis. Russia in August said it would reduce exports by 300,000 bpd until the end of this year.  Plastic Pollution

The Saudi and Russian additional voluntary cuts come on top of April cuts agreed by them and several OPEC+ producers, which extend to the end of 2024.

Saudi Arabia, Russia to continue voluntary oil cuts

Borouge and Tadweer sign partnership to explore recycling opportunities in Abu Dhabi

Borouge, a leading petrochemical company that provides innovative and differentiated polyolefin solutions and Tadweer signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to explore opportunities in the management and adoption of best practices in waste management, sorting and mechanical recycling of polymers, said the company.
Tadweer, part of ADQ, is the sole custodian of waste management for the Emirate of Abu Dhabi and is committed to developing an integrated waste management sector and becoming a leader in extracting value from waste to contribute to national sustainability ambitions.  Plastic Pollution
Borouge and Tadweer will explore further opportunities in polymers waste sorting for mechanical recycling and the development of a sustainable ecosystem, to secure the generation of high-quality polymer recyclates using different technologies. Furthermore, the partners will join forces to establish business development and benchmarking frameworks which unlock value added business opportunities through potential joint investments in brown and greenfield assets. The agreement reinforces Borouge and Tadweer’s leading industry positions and supports their circular economy ambitions.
Both companies will be collaborating in supporting local regulatory frameworks related to the sustainable and efficient management of polymer waste. This includes the launch of public initiatives and campaigns to boost awareness about best practices in polymer waste management and recycling.  Plastic Pollution
Committed to driving circularity for a zero-waste environment, Borouge has increased the number of strategic partnerships with recycling companies and expanded its product portfolio of sustainable solutions. Today, Borouge has 18 partnerships across eight countries serving its key territories in the Middle East and Asia-Pacific, marking an important milestone in its ambitions towards realising its 2030 strategy.
Borouge is a responsible petrochemical company with a portfolio of sustainable solutions. The Company works with customers, suppliers and value chain partners to address global challenges, with a comprehensive roadmap to reduce emissions. In addition, Borouge collaborates with the Environment Agency – Abu Dhabi to combat a multitude of environmental issues related to waste management.  Plastic Pollution
As part of its commitment to sustainability, Tadweer has built partnerships with leading global entities in Greece, Spain, Jordan, and more. These partnerships, which are focused on the exchange of knowledge and experience, contribute to driving a circular economy and achieving a sustainable future. Tadweer’s partners play a pivotal role in supporting the company to develop an integrated waste management system, in line with the UAE’s sustainability objectives.

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Borouge and Tadweer sign partnership to explore recycling opportunities in Abu Dhabi

UK implements new restrictions on single-use plastics

Commencing on 1 October 2023, the sweeping ban marks a watershed moment in the global fight against plastic waste.

On 1 October 2023, England took a significant step in its fight against plastic pollution with the introduction of new regulations banning several single-use plastic items.

In a bid to address the escalating problem of plastic pollution and litter, the UK government has implemented a series of bans and restrictions on single-use plastic items, taking effect on Sunday 1 October 2023.  Plastic Pollution

These measures, announced in January, will prohibit the sale of single-use plastic cutlery, balloon sticks, polystyrene cups and food containers across various sectors, including retailers, takeaways, food vendors and the hospitality industry.

Restrictions will also be placed on the supply of single-use plastic plates, trays and bowls.

Environmental impact and public support

Single-use plastics are known for their long-lasting environmental impact, taking hundreds of years to decompose and causing harm to oceans, rivers and land.

Furthermore, the production and disposal of plastic items contribute to greenhouse gas emissions. Research indicates that in England alone, approximately 2.7 billion single-use plastic cutlery items and 721 million single-use plates are used annually, with only a meagre 10% being recycled.  Plastic Pollution

These items, if lined up, would circle the globe more than eight-and-a-half times.

The public has overwhelmingly supported these measures, with 95% of respondents in favour of the prohibitions following a government consultation. This broad support reflects a shared commitment to reducing plastic waste and littering, particularly as plastic cutlery ranked among the top 15 most littered items in the country in 2020.

Collaboration and future initiatives

The government has worked closely with industry stakeholders to facilitate their transition to compliance with the new regulations. Businesses were provided with nine months from the publication of the consultation response to prepare and deplete existing stock.

Collaboration with trade bodies and local authorities has also played a crucial role in ensuring businesses and Trading Standards officers are well-prepared for the implementation of the new rules.  Plastic Pollution

The ban does not extend to single-use plastic plates, trays and bowls used as packaging in shelf-ready pre-packaged food items. These items will be addressed within the government’s plans for an extended producer responsibility scheme, designed to incentivise producers to minimise packaging and meet higher recycling targets.

These new measures are part of the UK government’s broader commitment to combat plastic pollution and eliminate avoidable plastic waste by 2042.

Prior actions included banning microbeads in personal care products in 2018, restricting the supply of plastic straws, stirrers and cotton buds in 2020 and introducing the Plastic Packaging Tax in April 2022.  Plastic Pollution

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UK implements new restrictions on single-use plastics

Recycling Technology – Petrochemicals Polymers – German industrial orders rebound in August but outlook uncertain  09-10-2023

Plastic Pollution

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