PET-to-PET EV-Car – Are plastic bale prices nearing bottom? 21-07-2023 - Arhive

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PET-to-PET EV-Car

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Recycling Record: PET to PET Sets New Benchmark with 17,700 Tons Recycled in First Half of 2023

PET to PET Recycling Österreich GmbH, located in Müllendorf, Austria, has achieved yet another remarkable milestone in the field of recycling. During the first half of 2023, the company successfully recycled 17,755 tons of PET beverage bottles, representing an impressive increase of over 17 percent compared to the previous year’s figure of 15,131 tons. This achievement highlights the continued commitment of PET to PET in closing the loop for PET beverage bottles in Austria. PET-to-PET EV-Car

Christian Strasser, the managing director of PET to PET, expressed delight in the increased volume processed and the positive impact it has on Austria’s PET beverage bottle loop. However, he also highlighted the challenges that lie ahead. The second half of the year is anticipated to witness a significant decline in recyclates used due to the persistently difficult economic situation, high inflation rates, and, most importantly, the considerable price gap between primary raw materials (virgin) and secondary raw materials (recyclates).

In a bid to innovate and further enhance sustainability, PET to PET has undertaken the construction of a photovoltaic (PV) plant. The expansion of the site area for food-grade finished products, completed in 2022, has now been topped with a photovoltaic system, spanning 6,400 m² and boasting an impressive output of 1,200 kWp. This new addition will incorporate 2,373 PV panels, which are expected to generate around 8 percent of the company’s required electrical energy. Future expansion stages aim to increase this value even further. Notably, PET to PET has already been operating its recycling plants using 100 percent renewable energy. PET-to-PET EV-Car

Austria has taken on a pioneering role in bottle-to-bottle recycling, with the majority of beverage packaging in the country comprising high-quality reprocessed used PET beverage bottles. Remarkably, Austria has already surpassed its recycling targets set for the future. The goal is to utilize at least 25 percent recyclates in PET beverage bottle production by 2025 and increase it to 30 percent by 2030. Thomas Billes, the managing director of PET to PET, proudly states that since 2007, Austria has not only achieved the 2030 targets but has significantly exceeded them, something all Austrians can take pride in.

Despite these achievements, the company acknowledges the challenges that persist, particularly concerning single-use plastic packaging. Although legal minimum recycling quotas of 50 percent have been defined for single-use plastic packaging starting in 2025, there is a lack of specification regarding who should use these recyclates and where they should be used. PET-to-PET EV-Car

Christian Strasser emphasizes the importance of taking appropriate measures to establish a seamless cycle for single-use plastic packaging.

For those interested in witnessing PET to PET’s innovative practices and sustainable initiatives, the company warmly welcomes visitors to its premises. As a leading example of successful PET recycling, PET to PET’s efforts contribute significantly to Austria’s circular economy and demonstrate the potential for sustainable practices within the global recycling industry.

In conclusion, PET to PET’s recycling achievements for PET beverage bottles in the first half of 2023 serve as a testament to the company’s dedication to sustainability and resource conservation. Their groundbreaking initiatives, such as the PV plant and their successful bottle-to-bottle recycling process, position Austria as a pioneer in the field of recycling. PET-to-PET EV-Car

However, with challenges still ahead, the company remains committed to finding solutions to promote seamless recycling and create a more sustainable future for all.

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Credit : PET to PET

Reactive Recycling: A Sustainable Approach Towards a Greener Future

Introduction : In our quest for a sustainable future, innovative approaches to waste management have emerged. Among them, reactive recycling stands out as a promising solution that not only reduces waste but also mitigates environmental harm. This article explores the concept of reactive recycling, its benefits, and its potential to contribute to a greener future. PET-to-PET EV-Car

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  1. Understanding Reactive Recycling (150 words): Reactive recycling is an advanced waste management approach that aims to convert discarded materials into valuable resources through chemical reactions. Unlike conventional recycling, which often involves downcycling or energy-intensive processes, reactive recycling focuses on transforming waste into high-quality materials or chemicals with a minimal environmental footprint.
  2. The Process of Reactive Recycling : The process of reactive recycling involves the conversion of waste materials through various chemical reactions. These reactions can include depolymerization, pyrolysis, hydrolysis, or other advanced techniques. By breaking down complex materials into simpler components, reactive recycling enables the extraction of valuable resources that can be used to create new products or feedstocks for manufacturing processes. This closed-loop approach minimizes waste generation and reduces the reliance on virgin resources. PET-to-PET EV-Car
  3. Environmental Benefits : Reactive recycling offers several environmental benefits. Firstly, it reduces the need for landfill space, alleviating the pressure on our limited land resources. Additionally, by diverting waste from traditional disposal methods, it decreases greenhouse gas emissions that result from waste decomposition. Moreover, since reactive recycling enables the extraction of valuable materials, it reduces the demand for raw materials, thereby conserving natural resources and mitigating the environmental impact of resource extraction.
  4. Economic Opportunities : Reactive recycling not only offers environmental advantages but also presents economic opportunities. By converting waste into valuable resources, it creates a potential revenue stream for businesses and promotes the development of a circular economy. PET-to-PET EV-Car
  5. Moreover, the demand for technologies and expertise in reactive recycling creates new job opportunities and stimulates innovation within the waste management sector.
  6. Challenges and Future Prospects : While reactive recycling holds significant promise, there are challenges that need to be addressed for its widespread implementation. These challenges include technological limitations, the need for infrastructure investments, and regulatory frameworks to support this emerging field. However, with advancements in research and development, along with increased awareness of the environmental and economic benefits, the future of reactive recycling appears bright. Continued collaboration between industries, governments, and academia will play a crucial role in unlocking the full potential of reactive recycling. PET-to-PET EV-Car
  7. Conclusion : Reactive recycling presents a sustainable approach to waste management that goes beyond traditional recycling methods. By harnessing chemical reactions to convert waste into valuable resources, it offers environmental benefits, economic opportunities, and contributes to the transition towards a circular economy. Embracing reactive recycling is a vital step towards a greener and more sustainable future.
PET-to-PET EV-Car

Credit : Nexam Chemical

Are plastic bale prices nearing bottom?

Plastic scrap prices continued their descent in July as supply outpaced demand.

Plastic scrap prices continued their descent in July as supply outpaced demand for polyethylene terephthalate (PET), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene (PP) recovered at material recovery facilities (MRFs) in the U.S.

A reprocessor based in the Southeast says natural HDPE bales have been selling in the low 30-cents-per-pound range as of mid-July, which represents a decline of 50 cents per pound over a five-week period. Mixed-color HDPE bales were selling for 8 cents per pound, down from nearly 20 cents per pound just a few weeks ago. PET-to-PET EV-Car

“Right now, all the markets are weak,” he says, adding that he suspects a general economic slowdown is to blame. “We’re seeing it across all industries.”

Demand is particularly soft from the pipe, flowerpot and automotive sectors, the reprocessor says, noting that automakers took downtime around the Fourth of July holiday, which hadn’t been the case in recent years as the industry tried to catch up from production delays related to pandemic-induced supply chain issues.

“When supply starts to shrink, then prices will rise. That’s the natural law.” — a PET reprocessor based in the Northeast PET-to-PET EV-Car

The manufacturing sector is in recession, he says, citing a recent trade association meeting where those in attendance spoke of reduced demand for recycled commodities of all types.

The Southeast-based reprocessor says HDPE bale prices likely have found the bottom, but he thinks PP bale prices, which were at 7 cents per pound in mid-July, will continue to fall.

He says demand for his company’s recycled material is off by 7 percent to 8 percent as of mid-July, though the reduction is providing a welcome break as the company hasn’t been able to take downtime for service given the strong demand it has been seeing until recently. “We’re taking the opportunity to bring things down and do much-needed maintenance,” he says, adding that three months of slowness would be fine but going beyond that “starts becoming painful.” PET-to-PET EV-Car

A MRF operator based in the Midwest also notes slowness in the market. “Pricing is trending down right this moment with the processing capacity downtime taken at some places due to additional capital being invested in the industry,” he says. “Supply is up, causing some pricing to come down.”

Despite the situation as of midsummer, the MRF operator is hopeful. “I think plastics will remain in high demand as we continue to see the pull through from brands trying to meet their sustainability goals,” he says.

A PET reprocessor based in the Midwest also says she believes trends support growing recycled-content demand going forward as consumer packaged goods companies realize if they are going to package their products in plastics, they need to be using recycled content. “I don’t think there’s any going back,” she adds. PET-to-PET EV-Car

She’d like to see the future bring more stability. “We would love to see a steady, stable market instead of the wild swings,” the PET reprocessor says.

However, low virgin PET pricing is affecting what consumers are willing to pay for recycled PET (rPET), she says, adding, “When you have your primary product price depressed, absolutely your secondary product is going to be price depressed. It’s hard to make the market work when pricing is this low.”

The Midwest-based PET reprocessor says the last year and a half has been a roller coaster ride. “Brands were really trying to move up their recycled content plans, and then the market got totally out of whack, and bales went to prices they never went to before,” she says. “Plans were really slowed down.” She adds that brands remain committed to using recycled content but the pace at which they are increasing rPET content has slowed given the volatility. PET-to-PET EV-Car

PET-to-PET EV-Car

Tata Group, the Indian conglomerate, has unveiled its plans to construct a £4 billion ($5.2 billion) electric car battery factory in the United Kingdom

This move aims to supply batteries for Tata’s Jaguar Land Rover brands while supporting the country’s initiative to phase out vehicles running on fossil fuels. With the UK planning to ban the sale of new high-polluting diesel and petrol cars by 2030, the automotive manufacturing sector is required to transition to electric vehicles.

Located in Somerset, southwest England, this factory will be Tata Group’s first gigafactory outside of India. Despite facing competition from Spain, the site in Somerset emerged as the preferred location. N. Chandrasekaran, the Chairman of Tata Group, stated that the facility would be one of Europe’s largest battery cell manufacturing plants and would introduce cutting-edge technology to the UK. PET-to-PET EV-Car

The British government hailed the project as a significant boost to the country’s automotive sector. It is projected that the factory will supply nearly half of the UK’s battery production demand by 2030. The investment will secure a local battery supply for Jaguar Land Rover, as well as other manufacturers in the UK and Europe. The factory is set to commence production in 2026, generating around 4,000 jobs and additional employment opportunities in the broader supply chain. PET-to-PET EV-Car

The UK’s objective of phasing out new diesel and petrol cars is part of its commitment to achieving net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, thus addressing climate change. Kemi Badenoch, the UK Business and Trade Secretary, expressed that this multi-billion-pound investment demonstrates that the government’s strategy for the automotive sector is on the right track.

Paul Morozzo, a senior climate campaigner at Greenpeace, described the announcement as a significant moment for the UK car industry, signaling that the government has finally joined the international race for clean technology. However, he cautioned that the UK government must remain committed to its 2030 target. Failing to do so could jeopardize the growth of the electric vehicle manufacturing sector in the UK, regardless of the establishment of the new gigafactory, potentially putting the entire domestic car manufacturing industry at risk. PET-to-PET EV-Car

This battery factory will be the second in the UK, in addition to the existing over 30 operational or planned battery plants across the European Union. Nissan pioneered the UK’s first battery gigafactory in Sunderland, northeast England, in 2013, primarily to support its Leaf electric car. In 2021, Nissan announced a further investment of £1 billion in a separate battery-only plant.

The construction of Tata Group’s gigafactory in the UK is a significant step toward achieving the country’s goals of transitioning to electric vehicles and reducing carbon emissions. It showcases the increasing importance of battery manufacturing in the automotive industry and highlights the UK’s commitment to sustainable transportation. With the expansion of electric vehicle infrastructure and the creation of thousands of jobs, this investment is expected to have a positive impact on the UK’s automotive sector and its overall economy.

Tata Group, the Indian conglomerate, has unveiled its plans to construct a £4 billion ($5.2 billion) electric car battery factory in the United Kingdom

Cirba Solutions and KULR Technology Group, Inc. have joined forces to develop a comprehensive lithium-ion battery and packaging recycling program

This collaboration aims to create a secure transportation platform that enables original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to store and transport various types of lithium-ion batteries, including prototypes, end-of-life batteries, damaged batteries, defective batteries, and recalled batteries. PET-to-PET EV-Car

The program will leverage KULR’s innovative SafeCASE technology and Cirba Solutions’ logistics and recycling services in the United States.

This exclusive U.S. program focuses on promoting sustainability in consumer lithium-ion batteries. KULR’s SafeCASE, which is fire-resistant, will be deployed on a large scale for immediate delivery. The ongoing partnership between Cirba Solutions and KULR is expected to yield additional products and solutions in the future, as they work together to meet the specific requirements of Cirba Solutions.

KULR’s SafeCASE, along with its SafeSLEEVE, is part of the company’s SafeX line of products. These offerings provide OEMs with customized form factors and configurations that ensure the safe storage and transportation of lithium-ion batteries. With the SafeCASE design, customers can easily transport and store lithium-ion batteries up to 2.5 kWh in a manner that prioritizes safety. Moreover, the solution’s reusability feature makes it cost-effective and sustainable. PET-to-PET EV-Car

Jay Wago, the Chief Commercial Officer of Cirba Solutions, emphasizes the critical importance of safely transporting lithium-ion batteries to increase recycling rates and establish a circular battery framework in the United States. He praises the SafeCASE design for its ability to provide a secure and user-friendly solution for customers. By prioritizing reusability, the collaboration between Cirba Solutions and KULR ensures that the program is both economically viable and environmentally sustainable.

Michael Mo, CEO of KULR, expresses enthusiasm about collaborating with Cirba Solutions. He highlights the shared goal of creating a safer and cleaner environment for everyone. KULR aims to contribute its proven thermal protection technologies to Cirba Solutions and its customers, further enhancing the safety and reliability of the battery transportation and recycling process. PET-to-PET EV-Car

By combining the expertise of Cirba Solutions in logistics and recycling services with KULR’s innovative battery storage and transportation solutions, the collaboration promises to revolutionize the way lithium-ion batteries are handled. The program will address the critical need for safe battery transportation, promote recycling initiatives, and contribute to the establishment of a circular economy for batteries in the United States.

With the increasing adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) and the growing demand for lithium-ion batteries, the safe handling and recycling of these batteries are paramount. By developing a robust program that addresses these concerns, Cirba Solutions and KULR are poised to make a significant impact on the sustainability of the EV industry. Their collaborative efforts will not only enhance the safety of battery transportation but also contribute to reducing the environmental footprint of lithium-ion batteries throughout their lifecycle. PET-to-PET EV-Car

In conclusion, the partnership between Cirba Solutions and KULR Technology Group, Inc. represents a significant step towards creating a comprehensive lithium-ion battery and packaging recycling program. By leveraging KULR’s SafeCASE technology and Cirba Solutions’ logistics and recycling services, the collaboration aims to provide OEMs with a secure and sustainable solution for storing and transporting lithium-ion batteries. Through their joint efforts, Cirba Solutions and KULR strive to increase recycling rates, promote a circular battery framework, and contribute to a safer and cleaner environment for all.

Cirba Solutions and KULR Technology Group, Inc. have joined forces to develop a comprehensive lithium-ion battery and packaging recycling program

Suez Recycling and Pyrum Innovations Collaborate to Establish UK’s First Tyre Recycling Plant

In a significant step towards enhancing tyre recycling in the United Kingdom, Suez Recycling and Recovery UK has signed a one-year exclusivity agreement with Pyrum Innovations, based in Dillingen/Saar, Germany. This partnership aims to construct the UK’s inaugural plant utilizing Pyrum’s groundbreaking pyrolysis technology for recycling end-of-life tyres. Over the next 12 months, Suez will identify a suitable location for the plant and commence the approval process, with Pyrum’s support. The facility is anticipated to consist of three pyrolysis reactors, with a yearly recycling capacity of approximately 20,000 tons of end-of-life tyres.PET-to-PET EV-Car

Pyrum’s patented pyrolysis reactor technology boasts the ability to recover high-quality raw materials from tyres, enabling savings of up to 72% in CO2 emissions compared to current recycling methods. During the pyrolysis process, tyres are disassembled into their constituent raw materials, namely oil, carbon black, and pyrolysis gas. The carbon black is reused in the manufacturing of new tyres, while the oil is collected by BASF for recycling into new products. Furthermore, the pyrolysis gas generated is utilized to power the plant, contributing to its sustainability. PET-to-PET EV-Car

Utilizing a mass balance approach, products derived from pyrolysis oil have demonstrated similar properties to those made from primary fossil resources. Additionally, they possess significantly lower CO2 footprints compared to conventional products. A study conducted by consulting firm Sphera revealed that manufacturing one ton of polyamide 6 (PA6) with Pyrum’s thermolysis oil emits approximately 1.3 tons less CO2 than producing the same amount of PA6 with fossil-based raw materials. PET-to-PET EV-Car

Tyre reinforcements commonly consist of polyester or viscose/rayon fabrics, with an average textile fibre content ranging between 0.25-0.35 kilograms per tyre in cars. Light commercial vehicle tyre reinforcements comprise polyester and steel, with around 0.30-0.35 kilograms of textile reinforcement per tyre. Presently, radial medium and heavy commercial vehicle tyres employ steel reinforcements, while cross-ply tyres possess primarily polyamide-based textile reinforcements, weighing between 4-5 kilograms per tyre.

By partnering with Pyrum, Suez aims to tap into the UK’s end-of-life tyre recycling market, where more than half of the annual 50 million (480,000 tons) used tyres are currently not recycled.PET-to-PET EV-Car

Suez brings a wealth of experience in delivering resilient waste management solutions and expertise in developing new infrastructure from design to operation.

John Scanlon, CEO at Suez Recycling and Recovery UK, expressed enthusiasm about the agreement, highlighting its potential to revolutionize the recycling of end-of-life tyres while significantly reducing CO2 emissions. Pascal Klein, CEO of Pyrum Innovations, added that the European rollout of their pioneering technology continues to progress, with the identification of the first UK site as the next crucial step, followed by collaborative completion of the approval process with local authorities.

The establishment of the UK’s first tyre recycling plant utilizing Pyrum’s pyrolysis technology represents a pivotal milestone for both Suez and the development of a more circular and resource-efficient economy in the UK. This collaboration is poised to make a substantial impact on the country’s tyre recycling capabilities and contribute to its sustainability goals. PET-to-PET EV-CarPET-to-PET EV-CarPET-to-PET EV-CarPET-to-PET EV-Carvv

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Suez Recycling and Pyrum Innovations Collaborate to Establish UK's First Tyre Recycling Plant In a significant step towards enhancing tyre recycling in the United Kingdom, Suez Recycling and Recovery UK has signed a one-year exclusivity agreement with Pyrum Innovations, based in Dillingen/Saar, Germany. This partnership aims to construct the UK's inaugural plant utilizing Pyrum's groundbreaking pyrolysis technology for recycling end-of-life tyres. Over the next 12 months, Suez will identify a suitable location for the plant and commence the approval process, with Pyrum's support. The facility is anticipated to consist of three pyrolysis reactors, with a yearly recycling capacity of approximately 20,000 tons of end-of-life tyres. Pyrum's patented pyrolysis reactor technology boasts the ability to recover high-quality raw materials from tyres, enabling savings of up to 72% in CO2 emissions compared to current recycling methods. During the pyrolysis process, tyres are disassembled into their constituent raw materials, namely oil, carbon black, and pyrolysis gas. The carbon black is reused in the manufacturing of new tyres, while the oil is collected by BASF for recycling into new products. Furthermore, the pyrolysis gas generated is utilized to power the plant, contributing to its sustainability. Utilizing a mass balance approach, products derived from pyrolysis oil have demonstrated similar properties to those made from primary fossil resources. Additionally, they possess significantly lower CO2 footprints compared to conventional products. A study conducted by consulting firm Sphera revealed that manufacturing one ton of polyamide 6 (PA6) with Pyrum's thermolysis oil emits approximately 1.3 tons less CO2 than producing the same amount of PA6 with fossil-based raw materials. Tyre reinforcements commonly consist of polyester or viscose/rayon fabrics, with an average textile fibre content ranging between 0.25-0.35 kilograms per tyre in cars. Light commercial vehicle tyre reinforcements comprise polyester and steel, with around 0.30-0.35 kilograms of textile reinforcement per tyre. Presently, radial medium and heavy commercial vehicle tyres employ steel reinforcements, while cross-ply tyres possess primarily polyamide-based textile reinforcements, weighing between 4-5 kilograms per tyre. By partnering with Pyrum, Suez aims to tap into the UK's end-of-life tyre recycling market, where more than half of the annual 50 million (480,000 tons) used tyres are currently not recycled. Suez brings a wealth of experience in delivering resilient waste management solutions and expertise in developing new infrastructure from design to operation. John Scanlon, CEO at Suez Recycling and Recovery UK, expressed enthusiasm about the agreement, highlighting its potential to revolutionize the recycling of end-of-life tyres while significantly reducing CO2 emissions. Pascal Klein, CEO of Pyrum Innovations, added that the European rollout of their pioneering technology continues to progress, with the identification of the first UK site as the next crucial step, followed by collaborative completion of the approval process with local authorities. The establishment of the UK's first tyre recycling plant utilizing Pyrum's pyrolysis technology represents a pivotal milestone for both Suez and the development of a more circular and resource-efficient economy in the UK. This collaboration is poised to make a substantial impact on the country's tyre recycling capabilities and contribute to its sustainability goals. For more information, please visit: Suez Recycling and Recovery UK: www.suez.co.uk Pyrum Innovations: www.pyrum.net

The Toxicity of Textile Dyes: Unveiling the Hidden Colours

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The textile industry is a major contributor to the global economy, providing us with an array of vibrant and fashionable clothing options. However, behind the beautiful hues of our garments lies a dark side – the toxicity of textile dyes. These dyes pose significant environmental and health risks due to their chemical composition and inadequate disposal practices. PET-to-PET EV-Car

Textile dyes can be classified into two major categories: natural dyes and synthetic dyes. While natural dyes are derived from plants, insects, or minerals, synthetic dyes are chemically synthesised using various compounds.

The chemical composition of synthetic dyes is a matter of concern. Many of these dyes contain hazardous substances such as heavy metals, aromatic amines, and formaldehyde-based compounds. Heavy metals like lead, chromium, cadmium, and mercury are commonly used in dyes and are known to have detrimental effects on human health and the environment. Aromatic amines, which are used as intermediates in the production of dyes, have been linked to carcinogenic properties. PET-to-PET EV-Car

Environmental Impact of Textile Dyes

Textile dyes have a significant environmental impact throughout their life cycle, from production to disposal. Below are some key points regarding the environmental impact of textile dyes:

Water Pollution: Textile dyeing is a water-intensive process, and large quantities of water are used to dye fabrics. The wastewater discharged from dyeing processes often contains high levels of chemicals, such as heavy metals, azo dyes, formaldehyde, and other toxic substances. When this wastewater is released into water bodies without proper treatment, it can contaminate rivers, lakes, and groundwater, adversely affecting aquatic ecosystems and the quality of drinking wat PET-to-PET EV-Car

Chemical Usage and Toxicity: Many textile dyes are synthetic and contain hazardous chemicals that are harmful to both human health and the environment. Some dyes may contain heavy metals like chromium, lead, cadmium, or mercury, which are toxic and can bioaccumulate in the environment. These chemicals pose risks to aquatic life, soil organisms, and may enter the food chain through bioaccumulatio

Energy Consumption and Carbon Footprint: The production of textile dyes requires significant energy inputs, mainly for the synthesis of dye molecules and the processing of raw materials.PET-to-PET EV-Car

The energy consumption contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and the overall carbon footprint of the textile industry. High energy consumption also implies a higher demand for fossil fuels, further exacerbating environmental issues.

Resource Depletion: Textile dyeing requires large amounts of water, chemicals, and other resources. The extraction and processing of these resources can lead to habitat destruction, land degradation, and depletion of natural resources. For instance, some natural dyes come from plants or insects, and unsustainable harvesting practices can threaten biodiversity and ecosystems. PET-to-PET EV-Car

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The Toxicity of Textile Dyes: Unveiling the Hidden Colours

CO2 and Green-Hydrogen – Is Reactive Recycling a Sustainable Approach Towards a Greener Future 20-07-2023